2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164330
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CNS Outcomes: Describing a Group CNS Practice
Author(s):
Edinger, Germaine M.; Finch-Guthrie, Patty
Author Details:
Germaine M. Edinger, MS, APRN, BC, CNS, North Memorial Health Care, Robbinsdale, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Patty Finch-Guthrie, PhD, APRN, BC, CNS
Abstract:
Purpose: Describe the evolution of one CNS group practice's experience with measuring outcomes using the three spheres of influence. Significance: Through the described efforts, CNSs at one institution were able to articulate their value to an organization. Design/Background/Rationale: Healthcare institutions need to be fiscally responsible. As advanced practice nurses, the CNSs need to be able to describe their value to the organization. They need to be able to articulate their value within all three spheres of influence. The description that follows is an example of how 13 CNSs described their group practice and individually used the data to improve their individual practices. Methods/Description: The group initially began with focus on the "patient" sphere. The group utilized NIC and NOC standardized language to describe the patient/family focus of the CNS practice. Simultaneously, a sub-group of the CNSs formed a task force to identify a process for collecting outcomes related to organizational and nursing spheres of influence. Findings/Outcomes: Identifying the most commonly used NIC for a diverse group of CNSs has been challenging. Through the collection of data related to the organizational sphere, the CNS group was able to articulate their contribution to broader organization. Conclusions: Using the 3 spheres of influence was a good framework for beginning to describe a group CNS practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCNS Outcomes: Describing a Group CNS Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEdinger, Germaine M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFinch-Guthrie, Pattyen_US
dc.author.detailsGermaine M. Edinger, MS, APRN, BC, CNS, North Memorial Health Care, Robbinsdale, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Patty Finch-Guthrie, PhD, APRN, BC, CNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164330-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Describe the evolution of one CNS group practice's experience with measuring outcomes using the three spheres of influence. Significance: Through the described efforts, CNSs at one institution were able to articulate their value to an organization. Design/Background/Rationale: Healthcare institutions need to be fiscally responsible. As advanced practice nurses, the CNSs need to be able to describe their value to the organization. They need to be able to articulate their value within all three spheres of influence. The description that follows is an example of how 13 CNSs described their group practice and individually used the data to improve their individual practices. Methods/Description: The group initially began with focus on the "patient" sphere. The group utilized NIC and NOC standardized language to describe the patient/family focus of the CNS practice. Simultaneously, a sub-group of the CNSs formed a task force to identify a process for collecting outcomes related to organizational and nursing spheres of influence. Findings/Outcomes: Identifying the most commonly used NIC for a diverse group of CNSs has been challenging. Through the collection of data related to the organizational sphere, the CNS group was able to articulate their contribution to broader organization. Conclusions: Using the 3 spheres of influence was a good framework for beginning to describe a group CNS practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:23Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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