2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164333
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effects of a Medical Response Team on the Incidence of In-Hospital
Author(s):
Enders, Katherine I.; Sevitts, Erin
Author Details:
Katherine I. Enders, MSN, RN, Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Erin Sevitts, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Can the implementation of a Medical Response Team prevent cardiopulmonary arrests in the in-hospital setting? Significance: Research indicates that the risk of death with in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest is between 50% and 80%. "Unexpected" cardiac arrests in hospitals are usually preceded by signs of clinical instability, typically beginning 6 to 8 hours prior to the arrest. Design/Background/Rationale: Charts were retrospectively reviewed for out-of-ICU cardiopulmonary arrests occurring over a three month period to establish organization-wide baseline data for the study. Methods/Description: Good Samaritan Hospital developed a Medical Response Team. Processes were developed for team activation. Team response includes assessment/management of the patient in collaboration with the patient's nurse. The patient's nurse maintains responsibility for the care of the patient. Physician contact is made as needed to obtain orders for diagnostics and treatment. The team assists, if needed, in providing the ordered care and staff education related to patient management. Findings/Outcomes: Post-implementation, out-of-ICU cardiopulmonary arrests have been reviewed and indicate significant decline in cardiopulmonary arrest.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffects of a Medical Response Team on the Incidence of In-Hospitalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEnders, Katherine I.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSevitts, Erinen_US
dc.author.detailsKatherine I. Enders, MSN, RN, Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Erin Sevitts, BSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164333-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Can the implementation of a Medical Response Team prevent cardiopulmonary arrests in the in-hospital setting? Significance: Research indicates that the risk of death with in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest is between 50% and 80%. "Unexpected" cardiac arrests in hospitals are usually preceded by signs of clinical instability, typically beginning 6 to 8 hours prior to the arrest. Design/Background/Rationale: Charts were retrospectively reviewed for out-of-ICU cardiopulmonary arrests occurring over a three month period to establish organization-wide baseline data for the study. Methods/Description: Good Samaritan Hospital developed a Medical Response Team. Processes were developed for team activation. Team response includes assessment/management of the patient in collaboration with the patient's nurse. The patient's nurse maintains responsibility for the care of the patient. Physician contact is made as needed to obtain orders for diagnostics and treatment. The team assists, if needed, in providing the ordered care and staff education related to patient management. Findings/Outcomes: Post-implementation, out-of-ICU cardiopulmonary arrests have been reviewed and indicate significant decline in cardiopulmonary arrest.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:26Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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