2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164334
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CNS Implements Diabetes Clinical Project
Author(s):
Farrell, Kathleen
Author Details:
Kathleen Farrell, DNSc, CS, CCNS, Murray State University, Murray, Kentucky, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: Purpose of the project was to establish a protocol to help volunteer healthcare providers render consistent, optimum care to clients receiving healthcare from a rural, subsidized community clinic for the working poor. Significance: The rural clinic provides care to the working poor of the community. Lack of access to healthcare is often cited as a reason for poor control of chronic illnesses such as diabetes. A variety of community healthcare professionals volunteer and provide the needed services at this clinic, yet this process often posed the problem of inconsistency in treatment regimens and lack of adequate follow-up. Practice guidelines have a proven track record, but must be implemented to work. Design/Background/Rationale: Retrospective data was retrieved from the diabetes patients' medical record for a one year period to conduct a quality-improvement study. Glycosated hemoglobin levels (HgbA1c), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and blood pressure readings were monitored and analyzed to determine the clinical outcomes of care. This small, quality-improvement study demonstrated the need to establish consistency in the care being delivered to the clients. Methods/Description: CNS established protocol based on American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines and recommendations from the ATP II guidelines and JNC VII recommendations. In addition, a decision algorithm was established for all providers to use. Consistency was established by having the CNS oversee the care of all the diabetes patients. Findings/Outcomes: 1. Mean HgbA1c levels went from 9.9% to 7.2%. 2. > 90% clients are partnering with providers and setting realistic goals. 3. Several individual case studies indicate good control now established. 4. A variety of healthcare professionals can provide quality, consistent healthcare despite a setting with many obstacles. Conclusions: 1. Guidelines must be implemented to work. 2. Consistent care and follow-up lead to improved outcomes. 3. Clients must partner with the provider in managing chronic illness, rural, subsidized community clinic for the working poor.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCNS Implements Diabetes Clinical Projecten_GB
dc.contributor.authorFarrell, Kathleenen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Farrell, DNSc, CS, CCNS, Murray State University, Murray, Kentucky, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164334-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Purpose of the project was to establish a protocol to help volunteer healthcare providers render consistent, optimum care to clients receiving healthcare from a rural, subsidized community clinic for the working poor. Significance: The rural clinic provides care to the working poor of the community. Lack of access to healthcare is often cited as a reason for poor control of chronic illnesses such as diabetes. A variety of community healthcare professionals volunteer and provide the needed services at this clinic, yet this process often posed the problem of inconsistency in treatment regimens and lack of adequate follow-up. Practice guidelines have a proven track record, but must be implemented to work. Design/Background/Rationale: Retrospective data was retrieved from the diabetes patients' medical record for a one year period to conduct a quality-improvement study. Glycosated hemoglobin levels (HgbA1c), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and blood pressure readings were monitored and analyzed to determine the clinical outcomes of care. This small, quality-improvement study demonstrated the need to establish consistency in the care being delivered to the clients. Methods/Description: CNS established protocol based on American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines and recommendations from the ATP II guidelines and JNC VII recommendations. In addition, a decision algorithm was established for all providers to use. Consistency was established by having the CNS oversee the care of all the diabetes patients. Findings/Outcomes: 1. Mean HgbA1c levels went from 9.9% to 7.2%. 2. > 90% clients are partnering with providers and setting realistic goals. 3. Several individual case studies indicate good control now established. 4. A variety of healthcare professionals can provide quality, consistent healthcare despite a setting with many obstacles. Conclusions: 1. Guidelines must be implemented to work. 2. Consistent care and follow-up lead to improved outcomes. 3. Clients must partner with the provider in managing chronic illness, rural, subsidized community clinic for the working poor.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:27Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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