2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164335
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Community-Based Research: Implications for CNS Practice
Author(s):
Fauchald, Sally
Author Details:
Sally Fauchald, PhD, RN, The College of St. Scholastica, Grand Rapids, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: This presentation illustrates how results from community-based research can be utilized to develop education, prevention programs, and interventions for specialized populations. This research study identifies gaps in knowledge and strategies to address those gaps for this specialty population. Significance: CNSs can design, implement, and evaluate research in order to develop specific prevention and intervention strategies for specialized populations. Design/Background/Rationale: This study used a cross-sectional correlational design and a convenience sample of rural women to obtain data on characteristics that influence safer sex behaviors of these women. Methods/Description: A community-based survey was conducted with a sample of 578 rural women; this convenience sample completed a 90-item self-report survey consisting of four research instruments and a demographic questionnaire in order to determine the influence of select characteristics on safer sex behaviors. Findings/Outcomes: Findings suggest that age, educational level, and relationship status influence safer sex behaviors. The majority of participants (n = 515; 88.9%) do not believe they are at risk for HIV infection. Only 62.2% (n = 360) of women surveyed indicated they received HIV information from their healthcare provider. Women indicated that to them, safer sex behaviors are used primarily to prevent pregnancy. Conclusions: The results of this study provide knowledge of the variables that impact HIV risk behaviors.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCommunity-Based Research: Implications for CNS Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFauchald, Sallyen_US
dc.author.detailsSally Fauchald, PhD, RN, The College of St. Scholastica, Grand Rapids, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164335-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This presentation illustrates how results from community-based research can be utilized to develop education, prevention programs, and interventions for specialized populations. This research study identifies gaps in knowledge and strategies to address those gaps for this specialty population. Significance: CNSs can design, implement, and evaluate research in order to develop specific prevention and intervention strategies for specialized populations. Design/Background/Rationale: This study used a cross-sectional correlational design and a convenience sample of rural women to obtain data on characteristics that influence safer sex behaviors of these women. Methods/Description: A community-based survey was conducted with a sample of 578 rural women; this convenience sample completed a 90-item self-report survey consisting of four research instruments and a demographic questionnaire in order to determine the influence of select characteristics on safer sex behaviors. Findings/Outcomes: Findings suggest that age, educational level, and relationship status influence safer sex behaviors. The majority of participants (n = 515; 88.9%) do not believe they are at risk for HIV infection. Only 62.2% (n = 360) of women surveyed indicated they received HIV information from their healthcare provider. Women indicated that to them, safer sex behaviors are used primarily to prevent pregnancy. Conclusions: The results of this study provide knowledge of the variables that impact HIV risk behaviors.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:28Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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