Insulin Isn't Just for Breakfast Anymore: Transcending the Barrier to Tighten Glycemic Control in the Hospital

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164349
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Insulin Isn't Just for Breakfast Anymore: Transcending the Barrier to Tighten Glycemic Control in the Hospital
Author(s):
Modic, Mary Beth
Author Details:
Mary Beth Modic, RN-BC, The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: A variety of studies demonstrate a clear link between hyperglycemia and infection. Additionally, new insulins have been introduced over the past year that challenge the knowledge of the bedside nurse. Concomitantly, the complexity of the hospitalized patient with diabetes requires ever-expanding skills of the staff nurse. The purpose of this project was to eliminate the barriers that preclude the nurse from achieving tight glycemic control. Significance: There has been a significant increase in the number of patients with diabetes being admitted to hospitals, yet few process changes have been implemented to address the current management strategies advocated for maintaining blood sugars below 110mg/dl in the ICUs and 140mg/dl on the nursing units. Design/Background/Rationale: In 2003 the American College of Endocrinolgists released their position statement on the importance of tight glycemic control for the hospitalized patient. Since that time advanced practice nurses have been changing the practice environment so that nursing staff could incorporate the new guidelines into their practice. Methods/Description: A mutifaceted approach was used to inform, educate, and enlighten the nursing staff. The strategies consisted of an array of educational offerings, protocols, marketing campaigns, visual prompts, practice changes, quality monitoring, feedback sessions, and challenges to the staff to identify unit strategies to maintain euyglycemia. Findings/Outcomes: Glycemic targets have been well disseminated. Nurses have become proactive in identifying patients at risk for hyperglycemia. The use of the sliding scale has been reduced as the sole insulin adjunct to reduce blood sugars. Conclusions: Staff nurses deserve a practice environment that permits them to use their knowledge and clinical expertise in providing state of the art care. The clinical nurse specialist is well prepared to articulate the needs of the patient and implement the necessary system changes so that the staff nurse will be empowered to transform the clinical landscape.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInsulin Isn't Just for Breakfast Anymore: Transcending the Barrier to Tighten Glycemic Control in the Hospitalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorModic, Mary Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Beth Modic, RN-BC, The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164349-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: A variety of studies demonstrate a clear link between hyperglycemia and infection. Additionally, new insulins have been introduced over the past year that challenge the knowledge of the bedside nurse. Concomitantly, the complexity of the hospitalized patient with diabetes requires ever-expanding skills of the staff nurse. The purpose of this project was to eliminate the barriers that preclude the nurse from achieving tight glycemic control. Significance: There has been a significant increase in the number of patients with diabetes being admitted to hospitals, yet few process changes have been implemented to address the current management strategies advocated for maintaining blood sugars below 110mg/dl in the ICUs and 140mg/dl on the nursing units. Design/Background/Rationale: In 2003 the American College of Endocrinolgists released their position statement on the importance of tight glycemic control for the hospitalized patient. Since that time advanced practice nurses have been changing the practice environment so that nursing staff could incorporate the new guidelines into their practice. Methods/Description: A mutifaceted approach was used to inform, educate, and enlighten the nursing staff. The strategies consisted of an array of educational offerings, protocols, marketing campaigns, visual prompts, practice changes, quality monitoring, feedback sessions, and challenges to the staff to identify unit strategies to maintain euyglycemia. Findings/Outcomes: Glycemic targets have been well disseminated. Nurses have become proactive in identifying patients at risk for hyperglycemia. The use of the sliding scale has been reduced as the sole insulin adjunct to reduce blood sugars. Conclusions: Staff nurses deserve a practice environment that permits them to use their knowledge and clinical expertise in providing state of the art care. The clinical nurse specialist is well prepared to articulate the needs of the patient and implement the necessary system changes so that the staff nurse will be empowered to transform the clinical landscape.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:45Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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