2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164353
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impacting Outcomes of Orthopedic Patients At Risk for Delirium
Author(s):
Neitzel, Jennifer; Sendelbach, Sue
Author Details:
Jennifer Neitzel, MS, APRN, BC, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Sue Sendelbach, PhD, RN, CCNS, FAHA
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop an evidence-based approach to prevent and manage delirium in orthopedic patients. Significance: New onset of delirium occurs in up to 33% of hospitalized patients with hip fractures and is independently associated with poor functional recovery, even after adjusting for prefracture frailty. Delirious patients have more adverse reactions to therapeutic doses of medications, fall more frequently, and develop more infections and pressure ulcers. Delirium complicates hospital stays for 2.3 million patients, increases the average length of hospital stay by 6 days, and accounts for greater than $7 billion of Medicare expenditures. There's a beginning body of knowledge that suggests prevention may be the most effective approach. Methods/Description: Two CNSs led an interdisciplinary team consisting of physicians, pharmacists, a staff nurse, an integrative therapy practitioner, a behavioral health CNS, and a quality specialist. This team developed an evidence-based protocol that focused on a risk-factor intervention strategy to reduce delirium occurrence. The protocol was piloted on orthopedic patients. Findings/Outcomes: The pilot was successfully completed, with over 55 patients being placed on the protocol. Baseline data, including length of stay, number of patients on restraints, and sitter use, was compared with the pilot data. Conclusions: A multidisciplinary, multicomponent strategy focusing on prevention may be the most effective for delirium.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpacting Outcomes of Orthopedic Patients At Risk for Deliriumen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeitzel, Jenniferen_US
dc.contributor.authorSendelbach, Sueen_US
dc.author.detailsJennifer Neitzel, MS, APRN, BC, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Sue Sendelbach, PhD, RN, CCNS, FAHAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164353-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this work was to develop an evidence-based approach to prevent and manage delirium in orthopedic patients. Significance: New onset of delirium occurs in up to 33% of hospitalized patients with hip fractures and is independently associated with poor functional recovery, even after adjusting for prefracture frailty. Delirious patients have more adverse reactions to therapeutic doses of medications, fall more frequently, and develop more infections and pressure ulcers. Delirium complicates hospital stays for 2.3 million patients, increases the average length of hospital stay by 6 days, and accounts for greater than $7 billion of Medicare expenditures. There's a beginning body of knowledge that suggests prevention may be the most effective approach. Methods/Description: Two CNSs led an interdisciplinary team consisting of physicians, pharmacists, a staff nurse, an integrative therapy practitioner, a behavioral health CNS, and a quality specialist. This team developed an evidence-based protocol that focused on a risk-factor intervention strategy to reduce delirium occurrence. The protocol was piloted on orthopedic patients. Findings/Outcomes: The pilot was successfully completed, with over 55 patients being placed on the protocol. Baseline data, including length of stay, number of patients on restraints, and sitter use, was compared with the pilot data. Conclusions: A multidisciplinary, multicomponent strategy focusing on prevention may be the most effective for delirium.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:49Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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