2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164355
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Orchestrating Change by Defining Safe IV Medication Practices
Author(s):
Pena, Maria E.; Stark, Susan B.
Author Details:
Maria E. Pena, MSN, RN, Kansas University Hospital, Kansas City, Kansas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Susan B. Stark, MSN, RN, APRN, BC, Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee Mission, Kansas, USA
Abstract:
Purpose: To improve medication administration and monitoring practices, enhance patient outcomes, and improve staff satisfaction by using best practices to define medication monitoring parameters matching patient placement with staff competencies. Significance: Defining the level of care and required monitoring for high-risk, low-volume, and problem-prone intravenous medications empowered nurses to make decisions based on best practices instead of tradition. This resulted in optimal patient care and enhanced safe patient passage across the care continuum. Design/Background/Rationale: Lack of definition regarding medication administration and established monitoring guidelines often resulted in poor decision-making related to actual patient needs and nursing competencies. This mismatch created delays in patient placement, caused multiple patient transfers, resulted in inappropriate utilization of intensive care resources, and decreased customer satisfaction. Methods/Description: The clinical nurse specialist led a multidisciplinary committee with key stakeholders from nursing, pharmacy, and medical staff who extensively reviewed the literature to define safe medication practices and monitoring. Findings/Outcomes: A reference tool which defined adult dosages, monitoring parameters, frequency, and safety issues around medication administration was developed and implemented. Both bedside nurses, nursing leaders, physicians, and pharmacists are extremely satisfied with the tool and have made multiple recommendations for additions and modifications. Conclusions: The reference tool, "The Guidelines for Administration and Monitoring of IV Medications," provided an objective reference for matching patient placement with staff competencies and available resources.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOrchestrating Change by Defining Safe IV Medication Practicesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPena, Maria E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStark, Susan B.en_US
dc.author.detailsMaria E. Pena, MSN, RN, Kansas University Hospital, Kansas City, Kansas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Susan B. Stark, MSN, RN, APRN, BC, Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee Mission, Kansas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164355-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To improve medication administration and monitoring practices, enhance patient outcomes, and improve staff satisfaction by using best practices to define medication monitoring parameters matching patient placement with staff competencies. Significance: Defining the level of care and required monitoring for high-risk, low-volume, and problem-prone intravenous medications empowered nurses to make decisions based on best practices instead of tradition. This resulted in optimal patient care and enhanced safe patient passage across the care continuum. Design/Background/Rationale: Lack of definition regarding medication administration and established monitoring guidelines often resulted in poor decision-making related to actual patient needs and nursing competencies. This mismatch created delays in patient placement, caused multiple patient transfers, resulted in inappropriate utilization of intensive care resources, and decreased customer satisfaction. Methods/Description: The clinical nurse specialist led a multidisciplinary committee with key stakeholders from nursing, pharmacy, and medical staff who extensively reviewed the literature to define safe medication practices and monitoring. Findings/Outcomes: A reference tool which defined adult dosages, monitoring parameters, frequency, and safety issues around medication administration was developed and implemented. Both bedside nurses, nursing leaders, physicians, and pharmacists are extremely satisfied with the tool and have made multiple recommendations for additions and modifications. Conclusions: The reference tool, "The Guidelines for Administration and Monitoring of IV Medications," provided an objective reference for matching patient placement with staff competencies and available resources.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:51Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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