2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164356
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bridging the Gaps in Heart Failure Care: From Hospital to Home
Author(s):
Peterangelo, Melissa
Author Details:
Melissa Peterangelo, MS, CNS, CCRN, Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To develop a CNS-managed outpatient heart failure (HF) center. Significance: CNS-managed HF centers can reduce 30-day readmit rates, reduce hospital costs, decrease length of stay, and increase HF patients' quality of life scores. The CNS's holistic approach examines and impacts the multidimensional factors that exacerbate patients' HF. Design/Background/Rationale: Post-discharge support services are inadequate for the chronic heart failure patient. In 2004, 762 patients were discharged with a principle diagnosis of heart failure. The 2004 30-day readmission rate was 7.9%, and first quarter 2005 was 11.7%. Fifty-eight percent of patients received home healthcare post discharge, with no difference in this group's 30-day readmission rate. Methods/Description: The CNS conducted a literature review and examined current practice. Gaps occurred in discharge planning and follow-up. The CNS formed a HF Advisory Committee and piloted extensive heart failure education and phone follow-up for 2 months. Findings/Outcomes: One hundred thirty-nine charts were reviewed, with 43 deemed appropriate for heart failure teaching and follow-up. The 30-day readmission rate for these patients was 4.5%. There were no CHF-related ER visits. Conclusions: The positive CNS/patient relationship is instrumental in patient adherence to prescribed regimen. Focused education and phone follow-up by the CNS impacted the 30-day readmssion rate and are beneficial steps toward outpatient center development.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBridging the Gaps in Heart Failure Care: From Hospital to Homeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPeterangelo, Melissaen_US
dc.author.detailsMelissa Peterangelo, MS, CNS, CCRN, Good Samaritan Hospital, Dayton, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164356-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To develop a CNS-managed outpatient heart failure (HF) center. Significance: CNS-managed HF centers can reduce 30-day readmit rates, reduce hospital costs, decrease length of stay, and increase HF patients' quality of life scores. The CNS's holistic approach examines and impacts the multidimensional factors that exacerbate patients' HF. Design/Background/Rationale: Post-discharge support services are inadequate for the chronic heart failure patient. In 2004, 762 patients were discharged with a principle diagnosis of heart failure. The 2004 30-day readmission rate was 7.9%, and first quarter 2005 was 11.7%. Fifty-eight percent of patients received home healthcare post discharge, with no difference in this group's 30-day readmission rate. Methods/Description: The CNS conducted a literature review and examined current practice. Gaps occurred in discharge planning and follow-up. The CNS formed a HF Advisory Committee and piloted extensive heart failure education and phone follow-up for 2 months. Findings/Outcomes: One hundred thirty-nine charts were reviewed, with 43 deemed appropriate for heart failure teaching and follow-up. The 30-day readmission rate for these patients was 4.5%. There were no CHF-related ER visits. Conclusions: The positive CNS/patient relationship is instrumental in patient adherence to prescribed regimen. Focused education and phone follow-up by the CNS impacted the 30-day readmssion rate and are beneficial steps toward outpatient center development.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:53Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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