2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164357
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Single Case Design to Evaluate Practice
Author(s):
Ryan, Polly
Author Details:
Polly Ryan, PhD, RN, APRN, BC, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose is to present single case design (SCD) as a practice evaluation method that can be incorporated easily into practice and that results in measurable outcomes. Significance: Information obtained is a reflection of patient outcomes, practitioner and system effectiveness, and evidence-based care and programs. Design/Background/Rationale: Since the inception of the CNS role, practitioners have been challenged to find expedient methods of evaluating the effectiveness of interventions - and to do so in a manner that produces information meaningful to patients, other healthcare professionals, and administrators. Methods/Description: SCD is a simple, flexible method of evaluating effectiveness of interventions over time for individuals or groups of patients. Together, CNSs and patients identify clinical problem(s) and mutually set goal(s) designed to achieve target outcomes. Preliminary data are obtained repeatedly during a baseline phase using available assessment parameters and Individualized Rating Scales. Evidence-based interventions are implemented and repeated measures are collected. Findings/Outcomes: Using visual inspection methods, data from the baseline phase are compared with data from the intervention phase. Changes in outcomes are evaluated by visually inspecting changes over time. In addition, evaluation of CNS practice can occur by inspecting data across multiple patients. Conclusions: SCD includes simple designs allowing clinicians to determine association between the use of an intervention and outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Single Case Design to Evaluate Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Pollyen_US
dc.author.detailsPolly Ryan, PhD, RN, APRN, BC, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164357-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose is to present single case design (SCD) as a practice evaluation method that can be incorporated easily into practice and that results in measurable outcomes. Significance: Information obtained is a reflection of patient outcomes, practitioner and system effectiveness, and evidence-based care and programs. Design/Background/Rationale: Since the inception of the CNS role, practitioners have been challenged to find expedient methods of evaluating the effectiveness of interventions - and to do so in a manner that produces information meaningful to patients, other healthcare professionals, and administrators. Methods/Description: SCD is a simple, flexible method of evaluating effectiveness of interventions over time for individuals or groups of patients. Together, CNSs and patients identify clinical problem(s) and mutually set goal(s) designed to achieve target outcomes. Preliminary data are obtained repeatedly during a baseline phase using available assessment parameters and Individualized Rating Scales. Evidence-based interventions are implemented and repeated measures are collected. Findings/Outcomes: Using visual inspection methods, data from the baseline phase are compared with data from the intervention phase. Changes in outcomes are evaluated by visually inspecting changes over time. In addition, evaluation of CNS practice can occur by inspecting data across multiple patients. Conclusions: SCD includes simple designs allowing clinicians to determine association between the use of an intervention and outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:54Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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