3.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164360
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Rationale for Using the Ambulance When Experiencing Chest Pain
Author(s):
Waggoner, Robin
Author Details:
Robin Waggoner, MSN, RN, CNS, Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To identify gender differences and the rationale for people choosing personal transportation to the hospital when they are experiencing chest pain, instead of contacting the ambulance service. Significance: Numerous individuals with chest pain do not utilize the emergency medical services for transportation to the hospital. Design/Background/Rationale: Data indicates that large campaigns for emergency services have not been effective. Furthermore, there is limited empirical data regarding gender differences and the decision not to use the ambulance for transportation to the emergency department during chest pain or associated symptoms. Methods/Description: A convenient sample of 89 male (n = 40) and female (n = 49) patients with chest pain was administered a questionnaire upon arrival at the emergency department. Findings/Outcomes: Chi-square analysis revealed there was not a statistical significance for gender differences in selection of transportation to the hospital for chest pain (p = .832). However, there was a correlation between the method of transportation to the emergency department and the reason for selection (p < .005). Conclusions: People who drive themselves when experiencing chest pain, or have someone else bring them to the emergency department, are influenced by their inability to perceive potential complications before arrival at the hospital. Therefore, it might be assumed that personal assessments regarding severity of condition are based upon the necessity for transportation to the hospital, not on the requirement of early initiation of therapies for chest pain and the need for continuous cardiac monitoring en route to the hospital.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRationale for Using the Ambulance When Experiencing Chest Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaggoner, Robinen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Waggoner, MSN, RN, CNS, Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164360-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To identify gender differences and the rationale for people choosing personal transportation to the hospital when they are experiencing chest pain, instead of contacting the ambulance service. Significance: Numerous individuals with chest pain do not utilize the emergency medical services for transportation to the hospital. Design/Background/Rationale: Data indicates that large campaigns for emergency services have not been effective. Furthermore, there is limited empirical data regarding gender differences and the decision not to use the ambulance for transportation to the emergency department during chest pain or associated symptoms. Methods/Description: A convenient sample of 89 male (n = 40) and female (n = 49) patients with chest pain was administered a questionnaire upon arrival at the emergency department. Findings/Outcomes: Chi-square analysis revealed there was not a statistical significance for gender differences in selection of transportation to the hospital for chest pain (p = .832). However, there was a correlation between the method of transportation to the emergency department and the reason for selection (p < .005). Conclusions: People who drive themselves when experiencing chest pain, or have someone else bring them to the emergency department, are influenced by their inability to perceive potential complications before arrival at the hospital. Therefore, it might be assumed that personal assessments regarding severity of condition are based upon the necessity for transportation to the hospital, not on the requirement of early initiation of therapies for chest pain and the need for continuous cardiac monitoring en route to the hospital.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:57Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.