2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164366
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Have Fun with Competencies - Hold a Skills Fair!
Author(s):
Chamberlain, Barbara; Thomas, Janet
Author Details:
Barbara Chamberlain, MSN, APRN, BC, CNS, CCRN, Kennedy Health System, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Janet Thomas, MS, RN, C
Abstract:
Problem and significance: Keeping nurses in a health system informed of changes in policy while maintaining competency can be a challenge for the education department and the clinical nurse specialists. Nurses who are unaware of changes or unfamiliar with updates are more likely to make errors in a variety of ways. Purpose: The purpose of the skills fairs was to reach all the nursing staff and some ancillary staff at our three campuses as well as the surgical and dialysis centers to update them on the latest developments in nursing and to meet JACHO requirements. Description of the project: The project was a ten station skills fair given over a six week period at various times at each campus. Methods: The clinical nurse specialists, education team, and administrators met earlier this year to decide what the important items were that needed to be covered and how many stations would be needed to deliver this information. Ten topics were chosen: pain management, myths surrounding advance directives, blood administration documentation, restraint alternatives, skin breakdown prevention, safety indicators, code amber (abduction), adolescent rights, glucometer certification, and preparation for surgery. Each member of the Skills Fairs Team agreed to oversee a station and prepare the presentation for that station. Each facilitator at the station gave a short talk updating the group of 6-8 people; this was followed by a quiz or demonstration to validate competency. The participants then moved on to the next station. Outcomes and evaluation of the practice change: All participants were required to evaluate the skills fair and offer suggestions for future fairs. Overall the evaluations were very good. Participants are now aware of the various changes that have been implemented in the system and the clinical nurse specialists are following up to make sure appropriate competencies are being employed. Conclusions and implications for nursing: These highly successful skills fairs allowed the clinical nurse specialists arid the education team to impart a great deal of information by having the nurses and staff come to them rather than conducting unit-to-unit in-services. Because everyone was required to attend, the chance of missing someone was reduced and the basis for compliance and competency increased. The nursing and ancillary staffs are now aware of clinically important updates and are monitored for competency.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHave Fun with Competencies - Hold a Skills Fair!en_GB
dc.contributor.authorChamberlain, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Janeten_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Chamberlain, MSN, APRN, BC, CNS, CCRN, Kennedy Health System, Cherry Hill, New Jersey, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Janet Thomas, MS, RN, Cen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164366-
dc.description.abstractProblem and significance: Keeping nurses in a health system informed of changes in policy while maintaining competency can be a challenge for the education department and the clinical nurse specialists. Nurses who are unaware of changes or unfamiliar with updates are more likely to make errors in a variety of ways. Purpose: The purpose of the skills fairs was to reach all the nursing staff and some ancillary staff at our three campuses as well as the surgical and dialysis centers to update them on the latest developments in nursing and to meet JACHO requirements. Description of the project: The project was a ten station skills fair given over a six week period at various times at each campus. Methods: The clinical nurse specialists, education team, and administrators met earlier this year to decide what the important items were that needed to be covered and how many stations would be needed to deliver this information. Ten topics were chosen: pain management, myths surrounding advance directives, blood administration documentation, restraint alternatives, skin breakdown prevention, safety indicators, code amber (abduction), adolescent rights, glucometer certification, and preparation for surgery. Each member of the Skills Fairs Team agreed to oversee a station and prepare the presentation for that station. Each facilitator at the station gave a short talk updating the group of 6-8 people; this was followed by a quiz or demonstration to validate competency. The participants then moved on to the next station. Outcomes and evaluation of the practice change: All participants were required to evaluate the skills fair and offer suggestions for future fairs. Overall the evaluations were very good. Participants are now aware of the various changes that have been implemented in the system and the clinical nurse specialists are following up to make sure appropriate competencies are being employed. Conclusions and implications for nursing: These highly successful skills fairs allowed the clinical nurse specialists arid the education team to impart a great deal of information by having the nurses and staff come to them rather than conducting unit-to-unit in-services. Because everyone was required to attend, the chance of missing someone was reduced and the basis for compliance and competency increased. The nursing and ancillary staffs are now aware of clinically important updates and are monitored for competency.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:47:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:47:04Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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