2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164374
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Caregiving: Depart from Burden, Focus on Duty and Satisfaction
Author(s):
Arevalo-Flechas, Lyda; Gill, Sara; Lewis, Sharon L; Braden, Carrie Jo; Acton, Gayle
Author Details:
Lyda Arevalo-Flechas, PhD, MSN, RN, email: arevalol@uthscsa.edu; Sara Gill; Sharon L. Lewis; Carrie Jo Braden; Gayle Acton
Abstract:
Purpose : To contrast the language and expressions used by bilingual (English/Spanish) Mexican American and monolingual (Spanish) Colombian Alzheimer's caregivers to describe their perception of their caregiving experience.


Methods: Caregivers (Mexican American n= 13 and Colombian n= 16) of relatives with Alzheimer's disease were enrolled. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed following a modified Spradley ethnographic methodology. Extensive participant observation of additional informants and artifacts were included in the data analyses.


Results: There were no differences between the 2 groups in the terminology used in Spanish to describe the impact of caregiving. The terminology used in English had literal and contextual translations to Spanish. None of the caregivers used the terms burden or carga to describe their experience. When specifically asked about the meaning of these two words, caregivers associated the word burden with negative financial consequences, and the word carga with the physical attribute of weight. Caregivers found the words burden and carga inappropriate to describe their experience. Positive aspects of caregiving such as the fulfillment of a family duty and a sense of satisfaction emerged as central themes and more important than the degree to which distress or burden were perceived.


Conclusions: Hispanic/Latino caregivers whether monolingual or bilingual describe their experience framed within ethnic and cultural values. The words burden and carga are culturally inappropriate to describe the Hispanic/Latino caregiving experience. Cultural issues and themes need to be considered when strategies are implemented to assist the increasing number of family caregivers as our society ages.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Gerontological Nursing Association 25th Annual Convention
Conference Host:
National Gerontological Nursing Association
Conference Location:
Palm Springs, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCaregiving: Depart from Burden, Focus on Duty and Satisfactionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorArevalo-Flechas, Lydaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGill, Saraen_US
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Sharon Len_US
dc.contributor.authorBraden, Carrie Joen_US
dc.contributor.authorActon, Gayleen_US
dc.author.detailsLyda Arevalo-Flechas, PhD, MSN, RN, email: arevalol@uthscsa.edu; Sara Gill; Sharon L. Lewis; Carrie Jo Braden; Gayle Actonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164374-
dc.description.abstractPurpose : To contrast the language and expressions used by bilingual (English/Spanish) Mexican American and monolingual (Spanish) Colombian Alzheimer's caregivers to describe their perception of their caregiving experience. <br/> <br/><br/>Methods: Caregivers (Mexican American n= 13 and Colombian n= 16) of relatives with Alzheimer's disease were enrolled. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed following a modified Spradley ethnographic methodology. Extensive participant observation of additional informants and artifacts were included in the data analyses.<br/><br/><br/> Results: There were no differences between the 2 groups in the terminology used in Spanish to describe the impact of caregiving. The terminology used in English had literal and contextual translations to Spanish. None of the caregivers used the terms burden or carga to describe their experience. When specifically asked about the meaning of these two words, caregivers associated the word burden with negative financial consequences, and the word carga with the physical attribute of weight. Caregivers found the words burden and carga inappropriate to describe their experience. Positive aspects of caregiving such as the fulfillment of a family duty and a sense of satisfaction emerged as central themes and more important than the degree to which distress or burden were perceived.<br/><br/><br/> Conclusions: Hispanic/Latino caregivers whether monolingual or bilingual describe their experience framed within ethnic and cultural values. The words burden and carga are culturally inappropriate to describe the Hispanic/Latino caregiving experience. Cultural issues and themes need to be considered when strategies are implemented to assist the increasing number of family caregivers as our society ages.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:52:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:52:02Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameNational Gerontological Nursing Association 25th Annual Conventionen_US
dc.conference.hostNational Gerontological Nursing Associationen_US
dc.conference.locationPalm Springs, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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