2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164384
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Contibutions of Seasoned Nurses to the Profession
Author(s):
Friedrich, Lisa; Prasun, Marilyn A.; Robinson, Sherry B.; Cates, Lori
Author Details:
Lisa Friedrich, MSN, CNL, RN-BC, Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, IL, email: lisarn@grics.net; Marilyn A. Prasun, PhD, CCNS, FANA, Sherry B. Robinson, PhD, RNCS, Lori Cates, RN-BC
Abstract:
The American Nurses Association projects that 65% of the current nurses will retire within this decade. By 2010, the supply of nurses will no longer meet the demand.(1) It is projected that by 2010 over 40% of the employed nurses will be beyond the age of 50.(2) A qualitative study was conducted which explored the meaning of being a seasoned nurse. What influenced nurses to continue in active practice and delay retirement was investigated. A phenomenology approach was used. Interviews were conducted with 13 nurses with a mean age of 67.85 years and 32.46 years of experience. A grounded theory method was used to analyze the data.
Rich data was obtained that provided insight into what inspires nurses to work beyond the age of retirement. Four themes were identified which included, preexisting factors, unique contributions, meet important needs, and retaining factors.
Seasoned nurses working at the bedside fill important needs and offer contributions to the nursing profession. Facilities should examine their retention strategies for older nurses. Specialized roles could be created that capitalize on their unique contributions and enable them to mentor new nurses in their areas of expertise. Further research is warranted regarding methods by which to optimize seasoned nurse's unique contributions.
(1)Osbourne, S. (2004, June). The art of rewarding and retaining staff-Part 1. Nurse Leader, 49-51.
(2)Auerbach, D.I., Buerhaus, P.I., & Staiger, D.O.(2007). Better late than never: Workforce supply implication of later entry into nursing. Health Affairs, 26(1), 178-185.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Gerontological Nursing Association 25th Annual Convention
Conference Host:
National Gerontological Nursing Association
Conference Location:
Palm Springs, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleContibutions of Seasoned Nurses to the Professionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFriedrich, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrasun, Marilyn A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Sherry B.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCates, Lorien_US
dc.author.detailsLisa Friedrich, MSN, CNL, RN-BC, Memorial Medical Center, Springfield, IL, email: lisarn@grics.net; Marilyn A. Prasun, PhD, CCNS, FANA, Sherry B. Robinson, PhD, RNCS, Lori Cates, RN-BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164384-
dc.description.abstractThe American Nurses Association projects that 65% of the current nurses will retire within this decade. By 2010, the supply of nurses will no longer meet the demand.(1) It is projected that by 2010 over 40% of the employed nurses will be beyond the age of 50.(2) A qualitative study was conducted which explored the meaning of being a seasoned nurse. What influenced nurses to continue in active practice and delay retirement was investigated. A phenomenology approach was used. Interviews were conducted with 13 nurses with a mean age of 67.85 years and 32.46 years of experience. A grounded theory method was used to analyze the data. <br/>Rich data was obtained that provided insight into what inspires nurses to work beyond the age of retirement. Four themes were identified which included, preexisting factors, unique contributions, meet important needs, and retaining factors. <br/>Seasoned nurses working at the bedside fill important needs and offer contributions to the nursing profession. Facilities should examine their retention strategies for older nurses. Specialized roles could be created that capitalize on their unique contributions and enable them to mentor new nurses in their areas of expertise. Further research is warranted regarding methods by which to optimize seasoned nurse's unique contributions.<br/>(1)Osbourne, S. (2004, June). The art of rewarding and retaining staff-Part 1. Nurse Leader, 49-51.<br/>(2)Auerbach, D.I., Buerhaus, P.I., &amp; Staiger, D.O.(2007). Better late than never: Workforce supply implication of later entry into nursing. Health Affairs, 26(1), 178-185.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:52:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:52:16Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameNational Gerontological Nursing Association 25th Annual Conventionen_US
dc.conference.hostNational Gerontological Nursing Associationen_US
dc.conference.locationPalm Springs, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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