2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164391
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Is Your Patient at Risk to Wander?
Author(s):
Krueger, Diane
Author Details:
Diane Krueger, MSN, RN-BC, UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside, Pittsburgh, PA, email: kruegerd@upmc.edu
Abstract:
According to the Alzheimer's Association, as many as 60% of people with Alzheimer's Disease will wander. In addition, patients without a history of dementia or wandering behavior may also be at risk to wander when placed in a strange environment or when dealing with an acute illness. Although there are currently no statistics available to indicate the incidence of wandering away and becoming lost in a hosptial setting, when patients with Alzheimer's Disease or other cognitive impairments are hospitalized in an unfamiliar enviornment, the risk for wandering away and becoming lost is very real.

Following the occurrence of a tragic event within our facility, a tool was developed to help identify those patients who may be at risk to wander. Interventions were also established for implementation as soon as patients were identified to be at risk.

Implications for Nursing Care for Older Adults:

As the number of older adults living with Alzheimer's Dementia and other cognitive impairments increases, it is imperative that caregivers are aware of the risk to wander. The use of a simple screening tool that is easy to use can help identify these patients more quickly, and allow interventions to be put into place in order to provide a safe environment.

Summary:

Identifying and managing patients that may be at risk to wander is a complex task in an acute care setting. Early identification through simple screening can help to heighten the awareness of this potentially dangerous behavior, and allow caregivers to implement interventions to prevent injury or other bad outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2010
Conference Name:
National Gerontological Nursing Association 25th Annual Convention
Conference Host:
National Gerontological Nursing Association
Conference Location:
Palm Springs, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIs Your Patient at Risk to Wander?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKrueger, Dianeen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Krueger, MSN, RN-BC, UPMC Presbyterian Shadyside, Pittsburgh, PA, email: kruegerd@upmc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164391-
dc.description.abstractAccording to the Alzheimer's Association, as many as 60% of people with Alzheimer's Disease will wander. In addition, patients without a history of dementia or wandering behavior may also be at risk to wander when placed in a strange environment or when dealing with an acute illness. Although there are currently no statistics available to indicate the incidence of wandering away and becoming lost in a hosptial setting, when patients with Alzheimer's Disease or other cognitive impairments are hospitalized in an unfamiliar enviornment, the risk for wandering away and becoming lost is very real.<br/><br/>Following the occurrence of a tragic event within our facility, a tool was developed to help identify those patients who may be at risk to wander. Interventions were also established for implementation as soon as patients were identified to be at risk. <br/><br/>Implications for Nursing Care for Older Adults:<br/><br/>As the number of older adults living with Alzheimer's Dementia and other cognitive impairments increases, it is imperative that caregivers are aware of the risk to wander. The use of a simple screening tool that is easy to use can help identify these patients more quickly, and allow interventions to be put into place in order to provide a safe environment.<br/><br/>Summary:<br/><br/>Identifying and managing patients that may be at risk to wander is a complex task in an acute care setting. Early identification through simple screening can help to heighten the awareness of this potentially dangerous behavior, and allow caregivers to implement interventions to prevent injury or other bad outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:52:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:52:25Z-
dc.conference.date2010en_US
dc.conference.nameNational Gerontological Nursing Association 25th Annual Conventionen_US
dc.conference.hostNational Gerontological Nursing Associationen_US
dc.conference.locationPalm Springs, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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