Learning preferences among ethnically diverse nursing students exposed to a variety of collaborative learning approaches including problem-based learning (DISS)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164444
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Learning preferences among ethnically diverse nursing students exposed to a variety of collaborative learning approaches including problem-based learning (DISS)
Abstract:
Learning preferences among ethnically diverse nursing students exposed to a variety of collaborative learning approaches including problem-based learning (DISS)
Conference Sponsor:National League for Nursing
Conference Year:1996
Author:Ishida, Dianne, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Hawaii at Manoa
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing 2528 The Mall, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA
Contact Telephone:8089565405
Objective: To study the learning preferences of ethnically diverse students who were exposed to a variety of collaborative learning (CL) approaches including problem-based learning (PBL).



Design: This was an 18 month qualitative follow-through study of the class of 1993 that utilized participant-observation, a life history questionnaire in the second semester, and an interview before graduation.



Sample: Seventeen students (half the generic baccalaureate nursing class) participated in the questionnaire with 12 students in the follow-up interview. Participant observation involved all 34 students.



Concepts Studies: The response of ethnically diverse students to various teaching strategies. Culture and its effect on student communication, response to varied learning situations, and processing of new information.



Methods: Participant-observation, living and learning questionnaire, and interview.



Findings: Nursing students from various ethnicity responded positively to CL approaches, particularly PBL. A majority of students processed new information by interacting with others. Relationships with peers and faculty were enhanced by the collaborative groups. Students reported taking ownership for their learning, learning team skills, and gaining increased confidence in their ability to practice. Clarification of student and faculty roles and ground rules were needed with PBL since the experience was generally new. Regularly evaluating the group's ability to work together and teaching them conflict management skills were also important.



Conclusions: Students from various ethnic groups felt PBL facilitated their educational process. They gained increased confidence in their ability to express themselves and seek answers to what they needed to know for future practice. The enhanced peer faculty relationships PBL groups facilitated student participation by ethnic groups that would normally be intimidated in lecture classes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
National League for Nursing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLearning preferences among ethnically diverse nursing students exposed to a variety of collaborative learning approaches including problem-based learning (DISS)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164444-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Learning preferences among ethnically diverse nursing students exposed to a variety of collaborative learning approaches including problem-based learning (DISS)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">National League for Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1996</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ishida, Dianne, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Hawaii at Manoa</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing 2528 The Mall, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">8089565405</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dianne@hawaii.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To study the learning preferences of ethnically diverse students who were exposed to a variety of collaborative learning (CL) approaches including problem-based learning (PBL).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Design: This was an 18 month qualitative follow-through study of the class of 1993 that utilized participant-observation, a life history questionnaire in the second semester, and an interview before graduation.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Sample: Seventeen students (half the generic baccalaureate nursing class) participated in the questionnaire with 12 students in the follow-up interview. Participant observation involved all 34 students.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Concepts Studies: The response of ethnically diverse students to various teaching strategies. Culture and its effect on student communication, response to varied learning situations, and processing of new information.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods: Participant-observation, living and learning questionnaire, and interview.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: Nursing students from various ethnicity responded positively to CL approaches, particularly PBL. A majority of students processed new information by interacting with others. Relationships with peers and faculty were enhanced by the collaborative groups. Students reported taking ownership for their learning, learning team skills, and gaining increased confidence in their ability to practice. Clarification of student and faculty roles and ground rules were needed with PBL since the experience was generally new. Regularly evaluating the group's ability to work together and teaching them conflict management skills were also important.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions: Students from various ethnic groups felt PBL facilitated their educational process. They gained increased confidence in their ability to express themselves and seek answers to what they needed to know for future practice. The enhanced peer faculty relationships PBL groups facilitated student participation by ethnic groups that would normally be intimidated in lecture classes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:58:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:58:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipNational League for Nursingen_GB
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