2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164578
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses’ coping and support after critical incident exposure
Author(s):
McEntee, Margaret
Author Details:
Margaret McEntee, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland-Baltimore School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: mcentee@son.umaryland.edu
Abstract:
Critical Incidents (CI) are sudden, powerful events that overcome the usually effective coping ability of well-trained professionals. Nurses are directly and vicariously exposed to CI and use support and coping strategies to mitigate the development of PTSD. The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency of CI, sources of support and coping of registered nurses. Mitchell's Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) served as the conceptual model for the study. Fifty-four experienced nurses enrolled in two clinical courses of a RN-BSN program were surveyed to elicit exposure to CI, perceived support, coping strategies, including the Ways of Coping checklist (WOC). The subjects were primarily white females, hospital-based, with at least 3 years experience in their current roles. Sixty-nine percent of the nurses (n = 38) reported at least one CI. Respondents in hospital settings reported significantly CI (M = 18.29) than non-hospital nurses (M = 4.14) (t = 2.13, p <.05). The 3 most frequently reported CI were: Dealing with overwrought families, verbal assaults, and death after prolonged CPR. The respondents identified peers as the greatest source of support during CI (M = 4.11) with significantly less support from administrators/supervisors. Ratings of family support and the WOC Seeking Social Support sub-scale were significantly correlated, r = .356, p <.05. The use of Planful Problem-Solving differed as a function of age, F (4,31) = 2.96, p <.05 and Positive Reappraisal differed as a function of years in nursing, F (3,32) = 5.27, p = <.05. Ten respondents (29%) received structured support via CISM debriefings or trained peer interventions and nine rated the support as effective. Twenty-one percent of the nurses reported increased alcohol intake during the 72 hours post CI. Nurses are exposed to CI as an occupational hazard and different nurses respond differently to the same CI. Further study of CI exposure is needed and intervention strategies that address the personal and social buffering factors must be developed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses’ coping and support after critical incident exposureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcEntee, Margareten_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret McEntee, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland-Baltimore School of Nursing, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, email: mcentee@son.umaryland.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164578-
dc.description.abstractCritical Incidents (CI) are sudden, powerful events that overcome the usually effective coping ability of well-trained professionals. Nurses are directly and vicariously exposed to CI and use support and coping strategies to mitigate the development of PTSD. The purpose of this study was to describe the frequency of CI, sources of support and coping of registered nurses. Mitchell's Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) served as the conceptual model for the study. Fifty-four experienced nurses enrolled in two clinical courses of a RN-BSN program were surveyed to elicit exposure to CI, perceived support, coping strategies, including the Ways of Coping checklist (WOC). The subjects were primarily white females, hospital-based, with at least 3 years experience in their current roles. Sixty-nine percent of the nurses (n = 38) reported at least one CI. Respondents in hospital settings reported significantly CI (M = 18.29) than non-hospital nurses (M = 4.14) (t = 2.13, p <.05). The 3 most frequently reported CI were: Dealing with overwrought families, verbal assaults, and death after prolonged CPR. The respondents identified peers as the greatest source of support during CI (M = 4.11) with significantly less support from administrators/supervisors. Ratings of family support and the WOC Seeking Social Support sub-scale were significantly correlated, r = .356, p <.05. The use of Planful Problem-Solving differed as a function of age, F (4,31) = 2.96, p <.05 and Positive Reappraisal differed as a function of years in nursing, F (3,32) = 5.27, p = <.05. Ten respondents (29%) received structured support via CISM debriefings or trained peer interventions and nine rated the support as effective. Twenty-one percent of the nurses reported increased alcohol intake during the 72 hours post CI. Nurses are exposed to CI as an occupational hazard and different nurses respond differently to the same CI. Further study of CI exposure is needed and intervention strategies that address the personal and social buffering factors must be developed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:33:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:33:46Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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