2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164579
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The use of ice for pain associated with chest tube removal
Author(s):
Sauls, Jenny
Author Details:
Jenny Sauls, DSN, Middle Tennessee State University School of Nursing, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA, email: jsauls@mtsu.edu
Abstract:
Significance: Every year more than 300,000 patients undergo cardiothoracic surgery, which may include Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG), valve replacement or repair, and repair of structural defects. All of these procedures require placement of at least one chest tube. Removal of these chest tubes has been described as one of the worst ICU experiences for these patients. Pain associated with chest tube removal (CTR) has been poorly controlled in many surgical patients. Many patients receive no preprocedural pain medication, and of those who do, pain control is often not achieved. Purpose: The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain if the application of ice would decrease pain before, during, and after chest tube removal in adults who have undergone cardiothoracic surgery. A total of 50 post-cardiac surgery patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Subjects in the experimental group received ice therapy (independent variable) for ten minutes before CTR, while subjects in the control group received a placebo. Theory and Methods: The Multidimensional Conceptualization of Pain Framework, and the theory of ice and conduction velocity provide the supporting frameworks to guide the study. The primary investigator (PI) applied ice on either side of the chest tube/s covering a six square inch area around the tube/s. The ice was applied directly over one four by four inch guaze dressing and was secured with three ten-inch strips of three inch cloth tape. The PI was notified by Nurse Practitioner (NP) or resident prior to CTR to provide time for the intervention. Pain intensity and pain distress (dependent variable) were measured on a 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and pain quality was measured using the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF). Baseline measures of pain distress and pain intensity were taken before ice application (Time 1), ice was applied for ten minutes, and pain intensity and pain distress were measured again immediately prior to CTR (Time 2). Immediately after CTR, pain intensity and pain distress were measured again (Time 3), and ten minutes later pain intensity and pain distress were measured for the last time (Time 4). The patient was also asked to rate the quality of his/her pain during CTR using the MPQ-SF at Time 4. Findings: Two Repeated Measures Design Analysis of Variance (RMD ANOVA) revealed no significant differences in pain intensity or pain distress between the experimental and control groups. A significant change in pain over time was noted in both groups with pain intensity and distress being most severe during chest tube removal. Descriptive statistics indicate that both groups used all the quality descriptors on the MPQ-SF for the sensory and affective components of pain. An independent samples t-test revealed no significant difference in level of severity for any descriptor between the two groups. Implications: Information gained from the results of the study will be used to provide better pain management for patients who suffer procedural pain from CTR. Continued research is encouraged in this area to evaluate other interventions used in managing pain associated with CTR.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe use of ice for pain associated with chest tube removalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSauls, Jennyen_US
dc.author.detailsJenny Sauls, DSN, Middle Tennessee State University School of Nursing, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA, email: jsauls@mtsu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164579-
dc.description.abstractSignificance: Every year more than 300,000 patients undergo cardiothoracic surgery, which may include Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG), valve replacement or repair, and repair of structural defects. All of these procedures require placement of at least one chest tube. Removal of these chest tubes has been described as one of the worst ICU experiences for these patients. Pain associated with chest tube removal (CTR) has been poorly controlled in many surgical patients. Many patients receive no preprocedural pain medication, and of those who do, pain control is often not achieved. Purpose: The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain if the application of ice would decrease pain before, during, and after chest tube removal in adults who have undergone cardiothoracic surgery. A total of 50 post-cardiac surgery patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Subjects in the experimental group received ice therapy (independent variable) for ten minutes before CTR, while subjects in the control group received a placebo. Theory and Methods: The Multidimensional Conceptualization of Pain Framework, and the theory of ice and conduction velocity provide the supporting frameworks to guide the study. The primary investigator (PI) applied ice on either side of the chest tube/s covering a six square inch area around the tube/s. The ice was applied directly over one four by four inch guaze dressing and was secured with three ten-inch strips of three inch cloth tape. The PI was notified by Nurse Practitioner (NP) or resident prior to CTR to provide time for the intervention. Pain intensity and pain distress (dependent variable) were measured on a 0-10 Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and pain quality was measured using the McGill Pain Questionnaire-Short Form (MPQ-SF). Baseline measures of pain distress and pain intensity were taken before ice application (Time 1), ice was applied for ten minutes, and pain intensity and pain distress were measured again immediately prior to CTR (Time 2). Immediately after CTR, pain intensity and pain distress were measured again (Time 3), and ten minutes later pain intensity and pain distress were measured for the last time (Time 4). The patient was also asked to rate the quality of his/her pain during CTR using the MPQ-SF at Time 4. Findings: Two Repeated Measures Design Analysis of Variance (RMD ANOVA) revealed no significant differences in pain intensity or pain distress between the experimental and control groups. A significant change in pain over time was noted in both groups with pain intensity and distress being most severe during chest tube removal. Descriptive statistics indicate that both groups used all the quality descriptors on the MPQ-SF for the sensory and affective components of pain. An independent samples t-test revealed no significant difference in level of severity for any descriptor between the two groups. Implications: Information gained from the results of the study will be used to provide better pain management for patients who suffer procedural pain from CTR. Continued research is encouraged in this area to evaluate other interventions used in managing pain associated with CTR.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:33:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:33:49Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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