2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164581
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Empowerment participatory education for HIV prevention
Author(s):
McQuiston, Chris
Author Details:
Chris McQuiston, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: chris_mcquiston@unc.edu
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: We are entering the third decade of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US. We have learned much about interventions with gay men, drug users, women, and people of color. Yet, we still have much to learn about culture specific HIV/AIDS interventions for recently emigrated Latinos. To be effective, HIV/AIDS interventions must be culturally and linguistically appropriate, and must occur within the context of the specific community in which they are being delivered. Nurses have a mandate to provide culturally competent care, but to do so, they must understand what their clients' needs are and how best to deliver nursing care. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to develop and deliver an empowering culture-specific lay health advisor (LHA) HIV prevention program (Protegiendo Nuestra Familia) for recently immigrated Mexicans in the US. METHOD: This program was based on the empowerment philosophy and methodology of Paulo Friere and guided by an ecological framework. The LHA model uses natural helpers in the community to disseminate information through their social networks. LHA programs identify natural helpers in the community and train them in specific health promotion and disease prevention strategies. An empowerment education methodology facilitated group identification of problems, critical analysis of the roots of the problems, and the development of strategies to positively change participant's lives and their communities. The LHAs attended seven workshops (three hours each) to receive training. Content included: 1) the role of the LHA, 2) information about HIV/AIDS (symptoms, transmission, testing and prevention), 3) STDs, 4) methods of prevention including condom use and ways to negotiate for safer sex, 5) information about how to make referrals and appointments at the local clinics, 6) confidentiality and ethical conduct, and 7) planning and evaluation strategies for "getting the word out about HIV/AIDS." Additionally, the LHAs participated in role-play exercises to increase their comfort level when discussing HIV/STDs and to facilitate introducing the topic of HIV. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the program demonstrated that: 1) the program was empowering on multiple levels, and 2) the LHAs are actively working in their community to spread the word about HIV prevention. They are providing assistance to community members in the form of: information (about HIV transmission and prevention), emotional support (listening and showing concern), and referrals (telling people where they can go for screening and or treatment). IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Cultural differences and language barriers make reaching recent Latino immigrants with HIV prevention strategies extremely difficult. Protegiendo Nuestra Familia demonstrates how community members can be trained to provide HIV prevention to difficult to access cultural groups.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmpowerment participatory education for HIV preventionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcQuiston, Chrisen_US
dc.author.detailsChris McQuiston, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of North Carolina School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: chris_mcquiston@unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164581-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: We are entering the third decade of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the US. We have learned much about interventions with gay men, drug users, women, and people of color. Yet, we still have much to learn about culture specific HIV/AIDS interventions for recently emigrated Latinos. To be effective, HIV/AIDS interventions must be culturally and linguistically appropriate, and must occur within the context of the specific community in which they are being delivered. Nurses have a mandate to provide culturally competent care, but to do so, they must understand what their clients' needs are and how best to deliver nursing care. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to develop and deliver an empowering culture-specific lay health advisor (LHA) HIV prevention program (Protegiendo Nuestra Familia) for recently immigrated Mexicans in the US. METHOD: This program was based on the empowerment philosophy and methodology of Paulo Friere and guided by an ecological framework. The LHA model uses natural helpers in the community to disseminate information through their social networks. LHA programs identify natural helpers in the community and train them in specific health promotion and disease prevention strategies. An empowerment education methodology facilitated group identification of problems, critical analysis of the roots of the problems, and the development of strategies to positively change participant's lives and their communities. The LHAs attended seven workshops (three hours each) to receive training. Content included: 1) the role of the LHA, 2) information about HIV/AIDS (symptoms, transmission, testing and prevention), 3) STDs, 4) methods of prevention including condom use and ways to negotiate for safer sex, 5) information about how to make referrals and appointments at the local clinics, 6) confidentiality and ethical conduct, and 7) planning and evaluation strategies for "getting the word out about HIV/AIDS." Additionally, the LHAs participated in role-play exercises to increase their comfort level when discussing HIV/STDs and to facilitate introducing the topic of HIV. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the program demonstrated that: 1) the program was empowering on multiple levels, and 2) the LHAs are actively working in their community to spread the word about HIV prevention. They are providing assistance to community members in the form of: information (about HIV transmission and prevention), emotional support (listening and showing concern), and referrals (telling people where they can go for screening and or treatment). IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Cultural differences and language barriers make reaching recent Latino immigrants with HIV prevention strategies extremely difficult. Protegiendo Nuestra Familia demonstrates how community members can be trained to provide HIV prevention to difficult to access cultural groups.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:33:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:33:56Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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