2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164582
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meaningful questions and successful strategies for an evolving epidemic
Author(s):
Taliaferro, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Taliaferro, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: taliaferro@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
This legitimate question should be answered each time we consider a research project in any population. As researchers, we are accountable to patients, employers, data collection sites, and funding sources to design and implement studies with the potential to improve the health of patients. When the context and influences within our target population change, we must modify our questions and expand our repertoire of strategies. In the United States, AIDS began as an epidemic of death sentences in a well-defined population. Over the last five years, the terminal illness has become chronic and the demographics have diversified. With the introduction of protease inhibitors, we have seen persons with death sentences become long-term survivors. Longer life expectancies have resulted in new research questions such as back to work issues, insurance and health care issues and adherence to complicated medication regimens. In the area of demographics, heterosexual transmission has bypassed intravenous drug use as the most common mode of transmission in women. Prevention efforts in one cultural group are not effective in another. New treatments have reportedly decreased the impetus for safe sex practices among those participating in high-risk behaviors. Finding ways to improve health, even within our own borders, is challenging at best. When we expand our focus beyond the United States, the challenge becomes even more complex. The death rate from AIDS in richer countries has declined since protease inhibitors were introduced. Despite this decline, the worldwide total exceeded all previous years in 1999, reaching 2.6 million deaths. Worldwide, approximately 5.6 new HIV infections were diagnosed in 1999, bringing the estimated number living with HIV/AIDS to 33.6 million people (WHO, 2000). This symposium will address the implications of the changing epidemic for researchers. The first presenter will describe reproductive decision making of infected women in the southeastern region of the United States and the emergence of new concerns about violence. The second presenter will report on an educational project in the Caribbean and implications for research in less-developed countries. The focus of the last presentation will be recruiting subjects in the changing epidemic. While the context of this symposium is the AIDS epidemic, researchers in other populations may confront similar issues as demographic patterns continue to change or treatment advances alter the prognosis in other illnesses.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeaningful questions and successful strategies for an evolving epidemicen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaliaferro, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Taliaferro, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: taliaferro@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164582-
dc.description.abstractThis legitimate question should be answered each time we consider a research project in any population. As researchers, we are accountable to patients, employers, data collection sites, and funding sources to design and implement studies with the potential to improve the health of patients. When the context and influences within our target population change, we must modify our questions and expand our repertoire of strategies. In the United States, AIDS began as an epidemic of death sentences in a well-defined population. Over the last five years, the terminal illness has become chronic and the demographics have diversified. With the introduction of protease inhibitors, we have seen persons with death sentences become long-term survivors. Longer life expectancies have resulted in new research questions such as back to work issues, insurance and health care issues and adherence to complicated medication regimens. In the area of demographics, heterosexual transmission has bypassed intravenous drug use as the most common mode of transmission in women. Prevention efforts in one cultural group are not effective in another. New treatments have reportedly decreased the impetus for safe sex practices among those participating in high-risk behaviors. Finding ways to improve health, even within our own borders, is challenging at best. When we expand our focus beyond the United States, the challenge becomes even more complex. The death rate from AIDS in richer countries has declined since protease inhibitors were introduced. Despite this decline, the worldwide total exceeded all previous years in 1999, reaching 2.6 million deaths. Worldwide, approximately 5.6 new HIV infections were diagnosed in 1999, bringing the estimated number living with HIV/AIDS to 33.6 million people (WHO, 2000). This symposium will address the implications of the changing epidemic for researchers. The first presenter will describe reproductive decision making of infected women in the southeastern region of the United States and the emergence of new concerns about violence. The second presenter will report on an educational project in the Caribbean and implications for research in less-developed countries. The focus of the last presentation will be recruiting subjects in the changing epidemic. While the context of this symposium is the AIDS epidemic, researchers in other populations may confront similar issues as demographic patterns continue to change or treatment advances alter the prognosis in other illnesses.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:33:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:33:58Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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