2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164583
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Special issues of women with HIV/AIDS in the southeastern U.S
Author(s):
Sowell, Richard
Author Details:
Richard Sowell, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina-Columbia College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: richard.sowell@sc.edu
Abstract:
In the United States (U.S.) women are one of the fastest growing subgroup being diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. The South now represents the region of the U.S. with one of the largest number of new cases of HIV/AIDS being diagnosed in women. HIV-infected women in the South are predominately poor, non-white, single heads of households often with small children who have been infected through heterosexual contact. Like other long-term, life-threatening diseases, HIV/AIDS often retain the responsibility of caring for their families in addition to facing a debilitating disease characterized by declining health and opportunistic infections. It is impossible to address HIV/AIDS in women outside of the context of their daily lives and experiences. Purpose- The purpose of this paper is to identify and develop a better understanding of unique issues of a cohort of women with HIV/AIDS in the southern United States. The issues discussed in this paper represent a synthesis of data from an eight year program of research with HIV infected women in Georgia and South Carolina. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches to data collection were used in different phases of the research program. The research program consisted of two focus group studies (a total of 10 focus groups), a cross-sectional questionnaire study and a 3-year longitudinal study using questionnaires and individual interviews. This qualitative-quantitative approach facilitated a better understanding of the extent and influence of issues facing women with HIV/AIDS. Results- Children and issues around reproductive decision-making and violence were important issues for women with HIV/AIDS. Women identified children as one of the most important aspects of their lives. In making decisions to have a baby once diagnosed with HIV infection, HIV status was not the major consideration for many women. While most women (65%) did not want another baby, women viewed the decision to have a baby as theirs to make. However, they identified factors that would influence their decisions: a) partner's desire for a baby; b) concern for the baby's health; c) concern for their own health; d) having a good home for the baby if the mother died; and e) spiritual beliefs. Women participating in the quantitative phase of the study reported a concerning rate of violence. Overall, 68% of the women had experienced physical (59%) and/or sexual (52%) lifetime violence. Since becoming HIV-infected, 33% of the women reported having experienced physical (26%) and/or sexual (22%) abuse. Correlates of violence were examined in logistic regression. Greater intent to get pregnant (OR=0.9333), decreased present life satisfaction (OR=1.048), having three or more children (OR=0.474), and history of drug abuse (OR=0.794) significantly distinguished between women who experienced physical and/or sexual violence and those who had not.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSpecial issues of women with HIV/AIDS in the southeastern U.Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSowell, Richarden_US
dc.author.detailsRichard Sowell, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of South Carolina-Columbia College of Nursing, Columbia, South Carolina, USA, email: richard.sowell@sc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164583-
dc.description.abstractIn the United States (U.S.) women are one of the fastest growing subgroup being diagnosed with HIV/AIDS. The South now represents the region of the U.S. with one of the largest number of new cases of HIV/AIDS being diagnosed in women. HIV-infected women in the South are predominately poor, non-white, single heads of households often with small children who have been infected through heterosexual contact. Like other long-term, life-threatening diseases, HIV/AIDS often retain the responsibility of caring for their families in addition to facing a debilitating disease characterized by declining health and opportunistic infections. It is impossible to address HIV/AIDS in women outside of the context of their daily lives and experiences. Purpose- The purpose of this paper is to identify and develop a better understanding of unique issues of a cohort of women with HIV/AIDS in the southern United States. The issues discussed in this paper represent a synthesis of data from an eight year program of research with HIV infected women in Georgia and South Carolina. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches to data collection were used in different phases of the research program. The research program consisted of two focus group studies (a total of 10 focus groups), a cross-sectional questionnaire study and a 3-year longitudinal study using questionnaires and individual interviews. This qualitative-quantitative approach facilitated a better understanding of the extent and influence of issues facing women with HIV/AIDS. Results- Children and issues around reproductive decision-making and violence were important issues for women with HIV/AIDS. Women identified children as one of the most important aspects of their lives. In making decisions to have a baby once diagnosed with HIV infection, HIV status was not the major consideration for many women. While most women (65%) did not want another baby, women viewed the decision to have a baby as theirs to make. However, they identified factors that would influence their decisions: a) partner's desire for a baby; b) concern for the baby's health; c) concern for their own health; d) having a good home for the baby if the mother died; and e) spiritual beliefs. Women participating in the quantitative phase of the study reported a concerning rate of violence. Overall, 68% of the women had experienced physical (59%) and/or sexual (52%) lifetime violence. Since becoming HIV-infected, 33% of the women reported having experienced physical (26%) and/or sexual (22%) abuse. Correlates of violence were examined in logistic regression. Greater intent to get pregnant (OR=0.9333), decreased present life satisfaction (OR=1.048), having three or more children (OR=0.474), and history of drug abuse (OR=0.794) significantly distinguished between women who experienced physical and/or sexual violence and those who had not.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:33:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:33:59Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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