2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164584
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Only 500 miles away
Author(s):
Gray, Jennifer
Author Details:
Jennifer Gray, PhD, Faculty, University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: jgray@uta.edu
Abstract:
The worldwide impact of the AIDS epidemic can be seen in this hemisphere. As near as 500 miles south of the tip of Florida, the AIDS epidemic rages in the Dominican Republic (DR). Geographically close to the wealth and medical system of the United States, health care professionals in the DR fight the epidemic with limited knowledge and resources. International Child Care (ICC), a project of the United Methodist Committee on Relief, provides health care education and services in the DR and Haiti. With ICC providing coordination and local speakers, a group of faculty from the university went to the DR and Haiti and spent a week educating health care professionals about HIV/AIDS. Purposes-The paper has three purposes: 1) describe the seminars in the DR, 2) summarize the evaluation of the seminars by the health care professionals who attended, and 3) identify areas for research and service in the DR and other developing countries. Overview-Local speakers at both sites began the seminars by presenting the current state of HIV/AIDS in that area. These speakers discussed the goals of the country related to HIV/AIDS and local resources. For example, one of the national goals in the DR was testing 60% of the blood used for transfusions for HIV. No antiretroviral drugs were available in either community. Support groups or social services were uncommon. After the local speakers concluded, the nursing care of the person with HIV/AIDS. In Santiago, 133 participants completed evaluations. Some had traveled as far as 150 kilometers to attend the one-day session. In Santo Domingo, the audience was comprised of 34 nurses, physicians and medical students. Participants were asked to submit questions for discussion at the end of the seminar. At both sites, the health care professionals had questions about their own safety in caring for persons with HIV infection. When asked to describe what they had learned from the seminar, over half of all participants wrote comments about the importance of providing emotional and spiritual support. Many respondents noted an increased awareness of treating the person with respect. Related to physical care, they noted the importance of providing adequate nutrition and preventing other infections. Several also noted the importance of wearing gloves and preventing transmission. As we consider how we can best reach out to our world neighbors, we must remember meaningful research questions and appropriate strategies will vary depending on the culture and needs of the country. The strengths and limitations of this approach will be shared. The global HIV/AIDS epidemic provides challenging opportunities for nurses to be involved in research, education, and service. What are you willing to do?
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOnly 500 miles awayen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGray, Jenniferen_US
dc.author.detailsJennifer Gray, PhD, Faculty, University of Texas at Arlington School of Nursing, Arlington, Texas, USA, email: jgray@uta.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164584-
dc.description.abstractThe worldwide impact of the AIDS epidemic can be seen in this hemisphere. As near as 500 miles south of the tip of Florida, the AIDS epidemic rages in the Dominican Republic (DR). Geographically close to the wealth and medical system of the United States, health care professionals in the DR fight the epidemic with limited knowledge and resources. International Child Care (ICC), a project of the United Methodist Committee on Relief, provides health care education and services in the DR and Haiti. With ICC providing coordination and local speakers, a group of faculty from the university went to the DR and Haiti and spent a week educating health care professionals about HIV/AIDS. Purposes-The paper has three purposes: 1) describe the seminars in the DR, 2) summarize the evaluation of the seminars by the health care professionals who attended, and 3) identify areas for research and service in the DR and other developing countries. Overview-Local speakers at both sites began the seminars by presenting the current state of HIV/AIDS in that area. These speakers discussed the goals of the country related to HIV/AIDS and local resources. For example, one of the national goals in the DR was testing 60% of the blood used for transfusions for HIV. No antiretroviral drugs were available in either community. Support groups or social services were uncommon. After the local speakers concluded, the nursing care of the person with HIV/AIDS. In Santiago, 133 participants completed evaluations. Some had traveled as far as 150 kilometers to attend the one-day session. In Santo Domingo, the audience was comprised of 34 nurses, physicians and medical students. Participants were asked to submit questions for discussion at the end of the seminar. At both sites, the health care professionals had questions about their own safety in caring for persons with HIV infection. When asked to describe what they had learned from the seminar, over half of all participants wrote comments about the importance of providing emotional and spiritual support. Many respondents noted an increased awareness of treating the person with respect. Related to physical care, they noted the importance of providing adequate nutrition and preventing other infections. Several also noted the importance of wearing gloves and preventing transmission. As we consider how we can best reach out to our world neighbors, we must remember meaningful research questions and appropriate strategies will vary depending on the culture and needs of the country. The strengths and limitations of this approach will be shared. The global HIV/AIDS epidemic provides challenging opportunities for nurses to be involved in research, education, and service. What are you willing to do?en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:00Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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