2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164586
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sleep interventions in HIV
Author(s):
Taliaferro, Donna
Author Details:
Donna Taliaferro, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: taliaferro@uthscsa.edu
Abstract:
Hormonal and neurohumoral disturbances are common in persons with AIDS and are known to affect sleep, body temperature, and circadian patterns. Fever and night sweats are distressful, while interrupted sleep contributes to fatigue. Sleep is extremely sensitive to thermal environment, while factors that affect thermoregulations tend to stimulate responses to that environment. Cytokine production, which is high in late stages of AIDS, causes variations in body temperature by elevating the thermoregulatory set point. The influence of circadian alteration on stress related hormones and sleep has not been studied in the persons with advanced HIV disease. In addition, the influence of temperature variations on routine fever surveillance is under appreciated. Therefore, the specific aims of this study were compare adults with and without AIDS on: 1) the effects of melatonin on sleep efficiency, 2) changes in light (white to yellow) on circadian patterns, and 3) acetaminophen effects on "hectic" temperature patterns. Design: A quasi-experimental, repeated measures design was used. Repeated measure was used for observations made over four days (24 hour periods) and followed again week three and week seven. Between periods the subjects were given melatonin (.5mg), yellow light to use during sleep, and acetaminophen 650mg every six hours. The primary attribute variable includes the HIV seropositive status. Outcome variables are core body temperature; sleep efficiency, and melatonin levels. Methods: Subjects were monitored the first 48 hours using the Mini-Mitter (Sunriver, OR) Actiwatch to measure sleep efficiency and activity. Temperature was measured using the infrared tympanic thermometer (Genius, Carlsbad, NM). Saliva was collected every two hours during the second 48 hours. Melatonin was measured by an ELISA assay. Findings: A unique and significant difference in circadian patterns of temperature and hormones was found between the HIB positive individual and the non-HIV infected persons. Sleep patterns demonstrated significant changes when the melatonin and light were added. Conclusions: Altered circadian patterns can be phase shifted with the use of melatonin and light. Changes in sleep patterns may be indicative of altered circadian patterns. Implications: Sleep and fatigue are of concern with this population and altered rhythms demonstrate a lack of sleep quality due to the body's inability to maintain a typical circadian pattern.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSleep interventions in HIVen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaliaferro, Donnaen_US
dc.author.detailsDonna Taliaferro, PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: taliaferro@uthscsa.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164586-
dc.description.abstractHormonal and neurohumoral disturbances are common in persons with AIDS and are known to affect sleep, body temperature, and circadian patterns. Fever and night sweats are distressful, while interrupted sleep contributes to fatigue. Sleep is extremely sensitive to thermal environment, while factors that affect thermoregulations tend to stimulate responses to that environment. Cytokine production, which is high in late stages of AIDS, causes variations in body temperature by elevating the thermoregulatory set point. The influence of circadian alteration on stress related hormones and sleep has not been studied in the persons with advanced HIV disease. In addition, the influence of temperature variations on routine fever surveillance is under appreciated. Therefore, the specific aims of this study were compare adults with and without AIDS on: 1) the effects of melatonin on sleep efficiency, 2) changes in light (white to yellow) on circadian patterns, and 3) acetaminophen effects on "hectic" temperature patterns. Design: A quasi-experimental, repeated measures design was used. Repeated measure was used for observations made over four days (24 hour periods) and followed again week three and week seven. Between periods the subjects were given melatonin (.5mg), yellow light to use during sleep, and acetaminophen 650mg every six hours. The primary attribute variable includes the HIV seropositive status. Outcome variables are core body temperature; sleep efficiency, and melatonin levels. Methods: Subjects were monitored the first 48 hours using the Mini-Mitter (Sunriver, OR) Actiwatch to measure sleep efficiency and activity. Temperature was measured using the infrared tympanic thermometer (Genius, Carlsbad, NM). Saliva was collected every two hours during the second 48 hours. Melatonin was measured by an ELISA assay. Findings: A unique and significant difference in circadian patterns of temperature and hormones was found between the HIB positive individual and the non-HIV infected persons. Sleep patterns demonstrated significant changes when the melatonin and light were added. Conclusions: Altered circadian patterns can be phase shifted with the use of melatonin and light. Changes in sleep patterns may be indicative of altered circadian patterns. Implications: Sleep and fatigue are of concern with this population and altered rhythms demonstrate a lack of sleep quality due to the body's inability to maintain a typical circadian pattern.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:03Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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