2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164587
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceived illness experience and self-esteem in adolescents with cystic fibrosis
Author(s):
Christian, Becky
Author Details:
Becky Christian, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: bchristia@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Advances in healthcare technology have resulted in a dramatic increase in the survival age of children with cystic fibrosis (CF), with the majority of children now surviving into adulthood (MacLusky & Levinson, 1998). Health care professionals must focus interventions on ways to promote disease survival to support children and adolescents with CF as they adjust to the demands of growing up with a chronic illness (Christian & D'Auria, 1997; Weekes, 1995). Adolescence represents a key developmental transition for coming to terms with chronic illness and assuming primary responsibility for managing ongoing care into adulthood (Christian & D'Auria, 1997). The purpose of this descriptive, pilot study was to explore the psychosocial impact of CF on 21 adolescents (mean = 14 years; range = 12-18 years) from a regional CF center in southeastern United States, as evidenced by perceived illness experience and self-esteem. Adolescents completed the Perceived Illness Experience instrument (Eiser, et al., 1995), and the Self-Perception Profile in Adolescents (Harter, 1985). Pearson correlations were computed for the major variables and subscales. Strong associations were found among peer rejection and romantic appeal (r=-.637, p=.002) and physical appearance (r=-482, p=.027). Significant associations were found between athletic competence with integration in school (r = - .565, p = .008) and disclosure (r = - .481, p = .027). School integration was strongly associated with interference with activity (r = .789, p = .000); moderate associations were found between school integration and preoccupation with food (r = .481, p = .027), and disclosure (r = .467, p = .033). Peer rejection was significantly associated with disclosure (r = .595, p = .004) and manipulation& - use of the illness to avoid obligations (r = .474, p = .030). Findings of this pilot study suggest that adolescents with CF face a dual crisis when the demands of their chronic illness conflict with their developmental needs. Critical elements for psychosocial adjustment focused on integrating their chronic illness into the context of school activities and the developmental demands of adolescence. Thus, intervention strategies for adolescents with CF must incorporate developmental needs into management strategies within the context of their everyday lives.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceived illness experience and self-esteem in adolescents with cystic fibrosisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChristian, Beckyen_US
dc.author.detailsBecky Christian, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: bchristia@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164587-
dc.description.abstractAdvances in healthcare technology have resulted in a dramatic increase in the survival age of children with cystic fibrosis (CF), with the majority of children now surviving into adulthood (MacLusky & Levinson, 1998). Health care professionals must focus interventions on ways to promote disease survival to support children and adolescents with CF as they adjust to the demands of growing up with a chronic illness (Christian & D'Auria, 1997; Weekes, 1995). Adolescence represents a key developmental transition for coming to terms with chronic illness and assuming primary responsibility for managing ongoing care into adulthood (Christian & D'Auria, 1997). The purpose of this descriptive, pilot study was to explore the psychosocial impact of CF on 21 adolescents (mean = 14 years; range = 12-18 years) from a regional CF center in southeastern United States, as evidenced by perceived illness experience and self-esteem. Adolescents completed the Perceived Illness Experience instrument (Eiser, et al., 1995), and the Self-Perception Profile in Adolescents (Harter, 1985). Pearson correlations were computed for the major variables and subscales. Strong associations were found among peer rejection and romantic appeal (r=-.637, p=.002) and physical appearance (r=-482, p=.027). Significant associations were found between athletic competence with integration in school (r = - .565, p = .008) and disclosure (r = - .481, p = .027). School integration was strongly associated with interference with activity (r = .789, p = .000); moderate associations were found between school integration and preoccupation with food (r = .481, p = .027), and disclosure (r = .467, p = .033). Peer rejection was significantly associated with disclosure (r = .595, p = .004) and manipulation& - use of the illness to avoid obligations (r = .474, p = .030). Findings of this pilot study suggest that adolescents with CF face a dual crisis when the demands of their chronic illness conflict with their developmental needs. Critical elements for psychosocial adjustment focused on integrating their chronic illness into the context of school activities and the developmental demands of adolescence. Thus, intervention strategies for adolescents with CF must incorporate developmental needs into management strategies within the context of their everyday lives.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:05Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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