Theoretical relevance of health belief model and hypertension management in Korean-Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164588
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Theoretical relevance of health belief model and hypertension management in Korean-Americans
Author(s):
Fleury, Julie
Author Details:
Julie Fleury, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: jfleury@email.unc.edu
Abstract:
Hypertension (HTN) is a common chronic condition among Korean-Americans and an important risk factor for stroke and cardiovascular diseases, entailing loss in longevity, work output and healthcare expenditures. Despite this fact, a high prevalence of HTN (42% in men, 34% in women) with very low rate of awareness and control (12%) among Korean-American immigrants was reported (Kim, 2000). The HTN prevalence rate increased to 64% in older population, 55 years of age or older. The purpose of the study was to explore knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about the hypertension prevention and control, and to identify the motivators for and barriers to lifestyle modification for older Korean-Americans using in focus group sessions. The research is a part of a larger study which includes the development and implementation of a community-based intervention to enhance awareness of HTN, to promote lifestyle modification. A qualitative study with 4 focus groups (14 males and 17 females) was conducted with the participants aged 50 or older, and who were interested in sharing their perceptions and experiences related to hypertension and its management. Participants were members of 4 Korean churches in central North Carolina. Focus group discussions were guided by questions derived from the HBM as the theoretical basis for the study and designed to explore cultural and contextual issues and meanings related to hypertension and management issues that may influence lifestyle modification. The participants' age ranged from 50 to 71 and educational level from none to post- graduate level. Participants were representative of Korean-American community in general. The sessions were conducted in socioculturally congruent manner and led by a Korean-American. Audiotaped sessions in Korean were transcribed and translated into English. Content analysis and concept identification were used to explore the cultural relevance of the major HBM constructs and other core sociocultural meanings and issues. The coded data were compared both within and across groups. The findings of this study support and enhance HBM concepts for understanding the contributing factors for prevalence of hypertension and low rate control identified by the focus groups. The concepts identified include a) lack of knowledge of the risk factors of hypertension, b) lack of awareness of the potential serious consequences of untreated hypertension other than stroke, and c) the lack of signs and symptoms of the condition. Koreans being one of the most recent immigrants groups, primary concerns were working for daily living and existence; thus any "not serious" health issues were beyond their concern. Further the lack of proper health insurance is a barrier for primary prevention efforts including HTN monitoring and follow up. Other barriers such as inconvenience and language problem were stated frequently as deterrent factors. The HBM is focused on one's health behavior as the consequence health beliefs at the intrapersonal level. However, for Koreans in HTN management, health believes and barriers are also represented at sociocultural, ecological and societal levels. Thereby, in order to provide effective health promotion interventions to this population, these aspects need to be incorporated to the HBM.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Host:
Southern Nursing Research Society
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTheoretical relevance of health belief model and hypertension management in Korean-Americansen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFleury, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsJulie Fleury, PhD, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA, email: jfleury@email.unc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164588-
dc.description.abstractHypertension (HTN) is a common chronic condition among Korean-Americans and an important risk factor for stroke and cardiovascular diseases, entailing loss in longevity, work output and healthcare expenditures. Despite this fact, a high prevalence of HTN (42% in men, 34% in women) with very low rate of awareness and control (12%) among Korean-American immigrants was reported (Kim, 2000). The HTN prevalence rate increased to 64% in older population, 55 years of age or older. The purpose of the study was to explore knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes about the hypertension prevention and control, and to identify the motivators for and barriers to lifestyle modification for older Korean-Americans using in focus group sessions. The research is a part of a larger study which includes the development and implementation of a community-based intervention to enhance awareness of HTN, to promote lifestyle modification. A qualitative study with 4 focus groups (14 males and 17 females) was conducted with the participants aged 50 or older, and who were interested in sharing their perceptions and experiences related to hypertension and its management. Participants were members of 4 Korean churches in central North Carolina. Focus group discussions were guided by questions derived from the HBM as the theoretical basis for the study and designed to explore cultural and contextual issues and meanings related to hypertension and management issues that may influence lifestyle modification. The participants' age ranged from 50 to 71 and educational level from none to post- graduate level. Participants were representative of Korean-American community in general. The sessions were conducted in socioculturally congruent manner and led by a Korean-American. Audiotaped sessions in Korean were transcribed and translated into English. Content analysis and concept identification were used to explore the cultural relevance of the major HBM constructs and other core sociocultural meanings and issues. The coded data were compared both within and across groups. The findings of this study support and enhance HBM concepts for understanding the contributing factors for prevalence of hypertension and low rate control identified by the focus groups. The concepts identified include a) lack of knowledge of the risk factors of hypertension, b) lack of awareness of the potential serious consequences of untreated hypertension other than stroke, and c) the lack of signs and symptoms of the condition. Koreans being one of the most recent immigrants groups, primary concerns were working for daily living and existence; thus any "not serious" health issues were beyond their concern. Further the lack of proper health insurance is a barrier for primary prevention efforts including HTN monitoring and follow up. Other barriers such as inconvenience and language problem were stated frequently as deterrent factors. The HBM is focused on one's health behavior as the consequence health beliefs at the intrapersonal level. However, for Koreans in HTN management, health believes and barriers are also represented at sociocultural, ecological and societal levels. Thereby, in order to provide effective health promotion interventions to this population, these aspects need to be incorporated to the HBM.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T14:34:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T14:34:06Z-
dc.conference.hostSouthern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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