2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164590
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Starting a Cancer Survivorship Program- Where to Begin?
Author(s):
Cox, Patricia
Author Details:
Patricia Cox, MS, RN, ANP, AOCNP, Thomas Johns Cancer Hospital, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: tricia.cox@hcahealthcare.com
Abstract:
Administration/Leadership Development: According to the Institute of Medicine report, all oncology patients should receive a personalized treatment summary and care plan upon treatment completion to ease their transition to post treatment life. Side effects and late effects of treatment often afflict survivors long after treatment ends and their follow-up periods are over. It has become increasingly evident that the follow-up provided by the oncology community has not always served cancer survivorsÆ needs. The development of a computerized care plan which reflects the patientÆs disease, treatment received and adverse events experienced can serve as a tool to prevent fragmentation or substandard care after treatment. Providing care and support through an advanced practice nurse-run program can assist survivors through the tumultuous post treatment period. Physical needs can be met through physician or nurse practitioner visits, and emotional and psychosocial needs through the programÆs interdisciplinary team. The development of individualized care plans was the first significant step in the start of a survivorship program. This program was led by an advanced practice nurse with considerable interdisciplinary support. The initial database was developed for breast cancer followed by prostate cancer. This consisted of a review of all possible effects from disease or treatment (e.g. fatigue) and enabled us to combine these topics into a care plan based on the patientÆs disease course. This provided the basis for further patient assessments and interventions. Overwhelmingly, patients have responded that the addition of this survivorship clinic has provided them knowledge related to long term and delayed effects of treatment, leading to improved self-care. After this positive patient feedback and interdisciplinary input, we expanded the patient base to include utilization of the established breast navigation system to identify survivors for care planning. Providing a post treatment care plan serves to assure survivors that healthcare providers are knowledgeable in long term effects of treatment, their disease and the emotional and psychosocial care they need. In addition, it serves to empower survivors with self care options through knowledge and support, and build their confidence in their ability to live well after treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStarting a Cancer Survivorship Program- Where to Begin?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCox, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia Cox, MS, RN, ANP, AOCNP, Thomas Johns Cancer Hospital, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: tricia.cox@hcahealthcare.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164590-
dc.description.abstractAdministration/Leadership Development: According to the Institute of Medicine report, all oncology patients should receive a personalized treatment summary and care plan upon treatment completion to ease their transition to post treatment life. Side effects and late effects of treatment often afflict survivors long after treatment ends and their follow-up periods are over. It has become increasingly evident that the follow-up provided by the oncology community has not always served cancer survivorsÆ needs. The development of a computerized care plan which reflects the patientÆs disease, treatment received and adverse events experienced can serve as a tool to prevent fragmentation or substandard care after treatment. Providing care and support through an advanced practice nurse-run program can assist survivors through the tumultuous post treatment period. Physical needs can be met through physician or nurse practitioner visits, and emotional and psychosocial needs through the programÆs interdisciplinary team. The development of individualized care plans was the first significant step in the start of a survivorship program. This program was led by an advanced practice nurse with considerable interdisciplinary support. The initial database was developed for breast cancer followed by prostate cancer. This consisted of a review of all possible effects from disease or treatment (e.g. fatigue) and enabled us to combine these topics into a care plan based on the patientÆs disease course. This provided the basis for further patient assessments and interventions. Overwhelmingly, patients have responded that the addition of this survivorship clinic has provided them knowledge related to long term and delayed effects of treatment, leading to improved self-care. After this positive patient feedback and interdisciplinary input, we expanded the patient base to include utilization of the established breast navigation system to identify survivors for care planning. Providing a post treatment care plan serves to assure survivors that healthcare providers are knowledgeable in long term effects of treatment, their disease and the emotional and psychosocial care they need. In addition, it serves to empower survivors with self care options through knowledge and support, and build their confidence in their ability to live well after treatment.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:25Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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