2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164593
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
You are no longer alone
Author(s):
Doorenbos, Ardith
Author Details:
Ardith Doorenbos, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor at University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: doorenbo@u.washington.edu
Abstract:
Research Study: Most American Indian and Alaska Native languages do not have a word for cancer, perhaps because until recently, cancer was a rare disease in Native communities. In the past 50 years, however, cancer has become the second leading cause of death for American Indians and the leading cause of death among Alaska Natives. These rural populations also experience the worst cancer related disparities of any minority group in the U.S. in terms of access to services. These factors have resulted in the poorest survival for American Indians and Alaska Natives from all cancers combined among all racial/ethnic groups. The goal was to describe the satisfaction with a Telehealth cancer survivor support group for American Indians and Alaska Natives cancer sufferers, survivors, and their families in Alaska and Washington. Using the Ecosocial Model as the guiding framework to address health inequalities, the Native People for Cancer Control Telehealth Network, of tele-oncology services was created to promote better post-diagnosis cancer care for American Indians and Alaska Natives, improve support services for cancer sufferers, survivors, and families. A random sample of 50 American Indians and Alaska Natives cancer survivors who participated in the Native People for Cancer Control Telehealth Network cancer support groups were asked to complete a survey which included the Telehealth Satisfaction Questionnaire and two open ended questions. Descriptive statistics were used to explore satisfaction with various aspects of the Telehealth cancer support group. Thirty-two American Indians and Alaska Natives cancer survivors returned the survey. The mean age was 53 + 11 years. All were women and 54% were married. Most reported having a high school education (74%). Most reported had a diagnosis of late stage cancer (84%) and the most common diagnosis was breast cancer. Among the findings, cancer sufferers, survivors, and their families reported the greatest satisfaction with the opportunity to interact with other American Indian and Alaska Native cancer sufferers, survivors, and families in remote locations followed by the usefulness of the information presented. Linking geographically distant cancer survivors provided access to support services previously unavailable. These findings support the Ecosocial Model's pathways that link racial/ethnic inequality with lack of access.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleYou are no longer aloneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoorenbos, Ardithen_US
dc.author.detailsArdith Doorenbos, RN, PhD, Assistant Professor at University of Washington School of Nursing, Seattle, Washington, USA, email: doorenbo@u.washington.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164593-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: Most American Indian and Alaska Native languages do not have a word for cancer, perhaps because until recently, cancer was a rare disease in Native communities. In the past 50 years, however, cancer has become the second leading cause of death for American Indians and the leading cause of death among Alaska Natives. These rural populations also experience the worst cancer related disparities of any minority group in the U.S. in terms of access to services. These factors have resulted in the poorest survival for American Indians and Alaska Natives from all cancers combined among all racial/ethnic groups. The goal was to describe the satisfaction with a Telehealth cancer survivor support group for American Indians and Alaska Natives cancer sufferers, survivors, and their families in Alaska and Washington. Using the Ecosocial Model as the guiding framework to address health inequalities, the Native People for Cancer Control Telehealth Network, of tele-oncology services was created to promote better post-diagnosis cancer care for American Indians and Alaska Natives, improve support services for cancer sufferers, survivors, and families. A random sample of 50 American Indians and Alaska Natives cancer survivors who participated in the Native People for Cancer Control Telehealth Network cancer support groups were asked to complete a survey which included the Telehealth Satisfaction Questionnaire and two open ended questions. Descriptive statistics were used to explore satisfaction with various aspects of the Telehealth cancer support group. Thirty-two American Indians and Alaska Natives cancer survivors returned the survey. The mean age was 53 + 11 years. All were women and 54% were married. Most reported having a high school education (74%). Most reported had a diagnosis of late stage cancer (84%) and the most common diagnosis was breast cancer. Among the findings, cancer sufferers, survivors, and their families reported the greatest satisfaction with the opportunity to interact with other American Indian and Alaska Native cancer sufferers, survivors, and families in remote locations followed by the usefulness of the information presented. Linking geographically distant cancer survivors provided access to support services previously unavailable. These findings support the Ecosocial Model's pathways that link racial/ethnic inequality with lack of access.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:28Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.