2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164594
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Introduction to Clinical Oncology Nursing for Undergraduate Students
Author(s):
Erickson, Jeanne; DeGennaro, Gina; Goeke, Lucy; Cohen, Jeryl; Thomas, Tanya
Author Details:
Jeanne Erickson, PhD, RN, AOCN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: jme3a@virginia.edu; Gina DeGennaro, MSN, RN, AOCN, CNL; Lucy Goeke, BS, RN; Jeryl Cohen, BSN, RN; Tanya Thomas, BSN, RN
Abstract:
Education: Educators in baccalaureate nursing programs are responsible for introducing oncology nursing to future nurses. Since a dedicated course in oncology nursing is not the reality at most nursing schools, students usually learn cancer nursing concepts as part of a general medical-surgical nursing course with a clinical rotation component. Educators are challenged to promote a comprehensive introduction to clinical oncology nursing that enhances students' appreciation for the diversity within this specialty. At the University of Virginia, undergraduate nurse educators and clinicians on the inpatient oncology unit collaborated to determine the ideal mix of patient care assignments to provide undergraduate nursing students with a comprehensive introduction to clinical oncology nursing, while promoting the new AACN Essentials for Baccalaureate Education and the Oncology Nursing Standards of Care. Educators use this rubric to structure patient assignments so that students gain experience with patients at different developmental stages (young adult, geriatric) and at different stages in the disease trajectory (diagnosis, active treatment, and end-of life). Assignments are also planned so that students participate in the care of patients receiving different modalities of therapy (surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and biotherapy). Each student also receives a set of ONS PEP cards to gain experience with evidence-based symptom management for common problems, including myelosuppression, pain, mucositis, fatigue, and anxiety. Students are provided opportunities to practice communication skills with patients on difficult topics. They are also encouraged to discuss and reflect on professional issues frequently encountered in oncology nursing, such as moral distress, end-of-life decisions, and self-care strategies. Throughout the rotation, students monitor their own progress gaining diverse clinical experiences and reflect on their own responses to identify areas that are particularly challenging or rewarding. At the end of the semester, instructors and students evaluate how this diversity of experiences enhanced the students' introduction to oncology nursing. By structuring a comprehensive introduction to clinical oncology nursing, educators can emphasize the diversity of roles that are possible in an oncology nursing career and enhance students' knowledge of their clinical strengths as well as focus on future learning. More strategies are needed to enhance oncology nursing in undergraduate nursing education.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntroduction to Clinical Oncology Nursing for Undergraduate Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorErickson, Jeanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeGennaro, Ginaen_US
dc.contributor.authorGoeke, Lucyen_US
dc.contributor.authorCohen, Jerylen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Tanyaen_US
dc.author.detailsJeanne Erickson, PhD, RN, AOCN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, University of Virginia School of Nursing, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA, email: jme3a@virginia.edu; Gina DeGennaro, MSN, RN, AOCN, CNL; Lucy Goeke, BS, RN; Jeryl Cohen, BSN, RN; Tanya Thomas, BSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164594-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Educators in baccalaureate nursing programs are responsible for introducing oncology nursing to future nurses. Since a dedicated course in oncology nursing is not the reality at most nursing schools, students usually learn cancer nursing concepts as part of a general medical-surgical nursing course with a clinical rotation component. Educators are challenged to promote a comprehensive introduction to clinical oncology nursing that enhances students' appreciation for the diversity within this specialty. At the University of Virginia, undergraduate nurse educators and clinicians on the inpatient oncology unit collaborated to determine the ideal mix of patient care assignments to provide undergraduate nursing students with a comprehensive introduction to clinical oncology nursing, while promoting the new AACN Essentials for Baccalaureate Education and the Oncology Nursing Standards of Care. Educators use this rubric to structure patient assignments so that students gain experience with patients at different developmental stages (young adult, geriatric) and at different stages in the disease trajectory (diagnosis, active treatment, and end-of life). Assignments are also planned so that students participate in the care of patients receiving different modalities of therapy (surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and biotherapy). Each student also receives a set of ONS PEP cards to gain experience with evidence-based symptom management for common problems, including myelosuppression, pain, mucositis, fatigue, and anxiety. Students are provided opportunities to practice communication skills with patients on difficult topics. They are also encouraged to discuss and reflect on professional issues frequently encountered in oncology nursing, such as moral distress, end-of-life decisions, and self-care strategies. Throughout the rotation, students monitor their own progress gaining diverse clinical experiences and reflect on their own responses to identify areas that are particularly challenging or rewarding. At the end of the semester, instructors and students evaluate how this diversity of experiences enhanced the students' introduction to oncology nursing. By structuring a comprehensive introduction to clinical oncology nursing, educators can emphasize the diversity of roles that are possible in an oncology nursing career and enhance students' knowledge of their clinical strengths as well as focus on future learning. More strategies are needed to enhance oncology nursing in undergraduate nursing education.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:29Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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