Patient Self-Testing and Self-Management of Warfarin: Impact on the Oncology Patient

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164596
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Self-Testing and Self-Management of Warfarin: Impact on the Oncology Patient
Author(s):
Goldstein, Leigh
Author Details:
Leigh Goldstein, MSN, RN, OCN, Clinical Educator, Round Rock Medical Center, Round Rock, Texas, USA, email: lag65@austin.rr.com
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Oncology nurses care for patients with many different types of cancer and complications from cancer such as venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE is common among cancer patients with many requiring long-term treatment with Warfarin for VTE or for prevention of VTE. Monitoring the international normalized ratio (INR) is essential in maintaining appropriate levels of anticoagulation for people on Warfarin. Millions of Americans on Warfarin must visit their physicians frequently to monitor their INR. Without monitoring they are at risk for a multitude of complications including strokes and serious bleeding. Small hand held INR meters are available for patients to test their INR at home and manage their Warfarin dose based on predetermined algorithms. These monitors are similar to glucometers used by persons with diabetes to measure blood glucose. The purpose is to increase the oncology nurseÆs awareness of patient-self testing (PST) and patient self-management (PSM) of Warfarin. Increased awareness will assist in identifying patients that may be good candidates for PST/PSM needing long-term anticoagulation. Educating patients on the available technology will increase demand and support for PST/PSM of Warfarin. While PST/PSM will not be appropriate for every patient, it has proven to be at least as good as, and often better than conventional management of long term Warfarin therapy. Since the patient at home has the ability to test more frequently, the INR is kept in therapeutic range more often; subsequently complications from both thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events decrease. PST/PSM allows the patient increased control over their health management decisions by giving them access to technology and by providing a support network that increases independence and optimal outcomes. The oncology nurse can play a vital role in assisting these patients with their health management questions concerning Warfarin management.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Self-Testing and Self-Management of Warfarin: Impact on the Oncology Patienten_GB
dc.contributor.authorGoldstein, Leighen_US
dc.author.detailsLeigh Goldstein, MSN, RN, OCN, Clinical Educator, Round Rock Medical Center, Round Rock, Texas, USA, email: lag65@austin.rr.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164596-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Oncology nurses care for patients with many different types of cancer and complications from cancer such as venous thromboembolism (VTE). VTE is common among cancer patients with many requiring long-term treatment with Warfarin for VTE or for prevention of VTE. Monitoring the international normalized ratio (INR) is essential in maintaining appropriate levels of anticoagulation for people on Warfarin. Millions of Americans on Warfarin must visit their physicians frequently to monitor their INR. Without monitoring they are at risk for a multitude of complications including strokes and serious bleeding. Small hand held INR meters are available for patients to test their INR at home and manage their Warfarin dose based on predetermined algorithms. These monitors are similar to glucometers used by persons with diabetes to measure blood glucose. The purpose is to increase the oncology nurseÆs awareness of patient-self testing (PST) and patient self-management (PSM) of Warfarin. Increased awareness will assist in identifying patients that may be good candidates for PST/PSM needing long-term anticoagulation. Educating patients on the available technology will increase demand and support for PST/PSM of Warfarin. While PST/PSM will not be appropriate for every patient, it has proven to be at least as good as, and often better than conventional management of long term Warfarin therapy. Since the patient at home has the ability to test more frequently, the INR is kept in therapeutic range more often; subsequently complications from both thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events decrease. PST/PSM allows the patient increased control over their health management decisions by giving them access to technology and by providing a support network that increases independence and optimal outcomes. The oncology nurse can play a vital role in assisting these patients with their health management questions concerning Warfarin management.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:32Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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