2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164602
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hand Hygiene: A New Approach For Improving Compliance
Author(s):
Kennedy, Janine; Licitra, Catherine; Hiestand, Brian; Karcic, Michelle; Geary, Diana
Author Details:
Janine Kennedy, RN, MA, OCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: kennedyj@mskcc.org; Catherine Licitra, RN, MA; Brian Hiestand, RN; Michelle Karcic, RN; Diana Geary, PCT
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: Proper hand hygiene is the cornerstone of patient safety. The National Patient Safety Goals issued by the Joint Commission state that healthcare institutions must comply with hand hygiene guidelines from either the World Health Organization (WHO) or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At the Urgent Care Center (UCC) of a comprehensive cancer center, we have monitored hand hygiene compliance, with poor results. With a small sample size of only 20-30 patient encounters, compliance rates ranged from 20-40%. A multi-disciplinary group convened to implement a rapid result performance improvement project to address compliance issues and incorporate the WHO guidelines into practice. Members of this group included UCC clinical leadership, UCC nurses, UCC patient care technicians, Infection Control, Quality Assurance, Nursing Education, and Building Services. The group met weekly, comparing current workflows with proposed workflows that adapted the WHO guidelines, identifying environmental barriers, and brainstorming solutions. Identified environmental solutions which were implemented included the placement of glove boxes closer to the patient, change of hand sanitizer product, increased number of hand sanitizer stations within the patient care areas and throughout the unit, and individual hand sanitizers for staff. Educational sessions were conducted, which included a review of current compliance, WHO guidelines, workflow revisions, case scenarios, and return demonstration of hand hygiene competency. After implementation, monitoring of compliance began. The monitoring was conducted by 5 trained staff members, with actual observations of hand hygiene practices. The staff members observed entire patient encounters with the RN or PCT, and stopped them in their care when any breach of hand hygiene was about to occur. This allowed for staff members to learn in the moment, as well as protect the patient. In the first month after implementation we observed 391 patient encounters with a compliance rate of 96%. We have collected data quarterly, with an average compliance rate of 97%. This success of this rapid result project was due to the interventions proposed being clinician driven. The ongoing analysis of data will allow us to continuously assess our staffÆs compliance and identify any causative agents that may interfere with the proper hand hygiene process.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHand Hygiene: A New Approach For Improving Complianceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Janineen_US
dc.contributor.authorLicitra, Catherineen_US
dc.contributor.authorHiestand, Brianen_US
dc.contributor.authorKarcic, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeary, Dianaen_US
dc.author.detailsJanine Kennedy, RN, MA, OCN, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Memorial Sloan- Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: kennedyj@mskcc.org; Catherine Licitra, RN, MA; Brian Hiestand, RN; Michelle Karcic, RN; Diana Geary, PCTen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164602-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: Proper hand hygiene is the cornerstone of patient safety. The National Patient Safety Goals issued by the Joint Commission state that healthcare institutions must comply with hand hygiene guidelines from either the World Health Organization (WHO) or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At the Urgent Care Center (UCC) of a comprehensive cancer center, we have monitored hand hygiene compliance, with poor results. With a small sample size of only 20-30 patient encounters, compliance rates ranged from 20-40%. A multi-disciplinary group convened to implement a rapid result performance improvement project to address compliance issues and incorporate the WHO guidelines into practice. Members of this group included UCC clinical leadership, UCC nurses, UCC patient care technicians, Infection Control, Quality Assurance, Nursing Education, and Building Services. The group met weekly, comparing current workflows with proposed workflows that adapted the WHO guidelines, identifying environmental barriers, and brainstorming solutions. Identified environmental solutions which were implemented included the placement of glove boxes closer to the patient, change of hand sanitizer product, increased number of hand sanitizer stations within the patient care areas and throughout the unit, and individual hand sanitizers for staff. Educational sessions were conducted, which included a review of current compliance, WHO guidelines, workflow revisions, case scenarios, and return demonstration of hand hygiene competency. After implementation, monitoring of compliance began. The monitoring was conducted by 5 trained staff members, with actual observations of hand hygiene practices. The staff members observed entire patient encounters with the RN or PCT, and stopped them in their care when any breach of hand hygiene was about to occur. This allowed for staff members to learn in the moment, as well as protect the patient. In the first month after implementation we observed 391 patient encounters with a compliance rate of 96%. We have collected data quarterly, with an average compliance rate of 97%. This success of this rapid result project was due to the interventions proposed being clinician driven. The ongoing analysis of data will allow us to continuously assess our staffÆs compliance and identify any causative agents that may interfere with the proper hand hygiene process.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:39Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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