2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164604
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Bone Health Promotion in the Cancer Survivor
Author(s):
Maguire, Carolyn
Author Details:
Carolyn Maguire, RN, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: Maguirern@hotmail.com
Abstract:
Education: Cancer survivors are living longer as a result of earlier diagnosis and improved treatment. Increasing age combined with cancer treatments that affect bone health have resulted in an increasing incidence of osteoporosis among cancer survivors. Lumbar spine BMD loss following one year of hormonal cancer therapy or chemotherapy ranges from 2.6% to 7.7%. In 2005, osteoporosisrelated fractures were responsible for an estimated $19 billion in healthcare costs. By 2025, experts predict these costs will rise to approximately $25.3 billion. Nurses must be proactive in identifying and educating patients at risk for osteoporosis and initiating appropriate screening and therapy. The purpose of this project is to increase nursing awareness of bone health in cancer survivors by presenting evidence-based nursing education to outpatient oncology nurses via a nursing newsletter. Clinical information on maintaining bone health after a cancer diagnosis was developed as a nurse-authored article for the outpatient nursing newsletter. The article was distributed to all nurses in the outpatient oncology setting at a NY cancer center. Nurses who read the newsletter acknowledged an increased understanding of bone health and will incorporate the promotion of bone health into the patient plan of care. The nurse will be able to identify patients at increased risk, suggest diagnostic screening tests and counsel patients on treatment. Proactive management by oncology nurses will reduce patient fractures and improve quality of life during survivorship. Nurses must be proactive in identifying patients at risk for osteoporosis and initiating appropriate screening and therapy. There are many risk factors other than cancer treatment that affect bone health. Some risks such as age, gender or family history cannot be modified. Other risks - diet, calcium & vitamin D intake, active lifestyle and smoking - are modifiable. Protecting bone mass is an integral part of ongoing surveillance of cancer patients whose therapy regimens predispose the patient to skeletal damage so that interventions can be initiated before fractures occur. Providing nurses with a reader-friendly, evidence-based bone health newsletter increases clinical knowledge about osteoporosis and may improve patient clinical outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBone Health Promotion in the Cancer Survivoren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Carolynen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Maguire, RN, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, email: Maguirern@hotmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164604-
dc.description.abstractEducation: Cancer survivors are living longer as a result of earlier diagnosis and improved treatment. Increasing age combined with cancer treatments that affect bone health have resulted in an increasing incidence of osteoporosis among cancer survivors. Lumbar spine BMD loss following one year of hormonal cancer therapy or chemotherapy ranges from 2.6% to 7.7%. In 2005, osteoporosisrelated fractures were responsible for an estimated $19 billion in healthcare costs. By 2025, experts predict these costs will rise to approximately $25.3 billion. Nurses must be proactive in identifying and educating patients at risk for osteoporosis and initiating appropriate screening and therapy. The purpose of this project is to increase nursing awareness of bone health in cancer survivors by presenting evidence-based nursing education to outpatient oncology nurses via a nursing newsletter. Clinical information on maintaining bone health after a cancer diagnosis was developed as a nurse-authored article for the outpatient nursing newsletter. The article was distributed to all nurses in the outpatient oncology setting at a NY cancer center. Nurses who read the newsletter acknowledged an increased understanding of bone health and will incorporate the promotion of bone health into the patient plan of care. The nurse will be able to identify patients at increased risk, suggest diagnostic screening tests and counsel patients on treatment. Proactive management by oncology nurses will reduce patient fractures and improve quality of life during survivorship. Nurses must be proactive in identifying patients at risk for osteoporosis and initiating appropriate screening and therapy. There are many risk factors other than cancer treatment that affect bone health. Some risks such as age, gender or family history cannot be modified. Other risks - diet, calcium & vitamin D intake, active lifestyle and smoking - are modifiable. Protecting bone mass is an integral part of ongoing surveillance of cancer patients whose therapy regimens predispose the patient to skeletal damage so that interventions can be initiated before fractures occur. Providing nurses with a reader-friendly, evidence-based bone health newsletter increases clinical knowledge about osteoporosis and may improve patient clinical outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:41Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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