Process of Establishing the Evidence Base for Developing Guidelines for Spirituality Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164609
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Process of Establishing the Evidence Base for Developing Guidelines for Spirituality Care
Author(s):
Naluyima, Hermenegilde; Ingersoll, Shannon Spies
Author Details:
Hermenegilde Naluyima, RN, BSN, OCN, Staff RN, Gundersen Lutheran Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA, email: munywanyi@yahoo.com; Shannon Spies Ingersoll, CRNA, MS
Abstract:
Clinical/Evidence Based Practice: The importance of spiritual provision is a central component of health care, necessitating nurses to include this dimension of care. Spiritual care (SC) has been acknowledged as imperative to standardized care, however, the delivery of spiritual care and its influence on spiritual well-being (SWB) is under-documented. To develop evidence-based guidelines for providing spiritual care in a chemotherapy unit, the literature was reviewed and integrated with the patient and nurse perspectives of spiritual care delivery. The goal was to establish an evidence base for developing a guideline for providing spiritual care on a chemotherapy unit. A literature review was conducted to identify the influence of spiritual assessment on patientsÆ SWB. Patients and nurses on a chemotherapy unit completed the Caring Factor Survey (CFS), and Caring Factor Survey-Provider Version (CFS-PV) to document a baseline level of patient and nurse perceptions of nurse caring. Chemotherapy nurses participated in focus groups conducted in part to identify ways to deliver spiritual care. The literature suggests that: patients with a high level of SWB are more likely to adhere to their plan of care, demonstrate higher levels of exercise endurance, attain a higher positive attitude and are more likely to find meaning or purpose in life compared to patients with low SWB. Promotion of SWB is grounded in a nurses' personal awareness of SWB, which is critical to conducting a spiritual assessment. In turn, a spiritual assessment helps to establish an individualized approach to fostering SWB in patients. Data from the CFS and CFS-PV indicated overall high agreement that caring was provided, however, both patients and nurses rated the delivery and receipt of SC lower than other dimensions of caring. Focus group data indicated that many nurses felt uncomfortable beginning conversations addressing SC even though they were comfortable addressing end-of-life care planning. As clinical experts, nurses suggested the need for education on SC, identification of system resources to support SC, and the importance of words, such as joy, peace, and comfort, in making SC delivery explicit. The SPIRITUALITY Model is suggested as an abbreviated spiritual tool to foster individualized care plan development.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProcess of Establishing the Evidence Base for Developing Guidelines for Spirituality Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNaluyima, Hermenegildeen_US
dc.contributor.authorIngersoll, Shannon Spiesen_US
dc.author.detailsHermenegilde Naluyima, RN, BSN, OCN, Staff RN, Gundersen Lutheran Health System, La Crosse, Wisconsin, USA, email: munywanyi@yahoo.com; Shannon Spies Ingersoll, CRNA, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164609-
dc.description.abstractClinical/Evidence Based Practice: The importance of spiritual provision is a central component of health care, necessitating nurses to include this dimension of care. Spiritual care (SC) has been acknowledged as imperative to standardized care, however, the delivery of spiritual care and its influence on spiritual well-being (SWB) is under-documented. To develop evidence-based guidelines for providing spiritual care in a chemotherapy unit, the literature was reviewed and integrated with the patient and nurse perspectives of spiritual care delivery. The goal was to establish an evidence base for developing a guideline for providing spiritual care on a chemotherapy unit. A literature review was conducted to identify the influence of spiritual assessment on patientsÆ SWB. Patients and nurses on a chemotherapy unit completed the Caring Factor Survey (CFS), and Caring Factor Survey-Provider Version (CFS-PV) to document a baseline level of patient and nurse perceptions of nurse caring. Chemotherapy nurses participated in focus groups conducted in part to identify ways to deliver spiritual care. The literature suggests that: patients with a high level of SWB are more likely to adhere to their plan of care, demonstrate higher levels of exercise endurance, attain a higher positive attitude and are more likely to find meaning or purpose in life compared to patients with low SWB. Promotion of SWB is grounded in a nurses' personal awareness of SWB, which is critical to conducting a spiritual assessment. In turn, a spiritual assessment helps to establish an individualized approach to fostering SWB in patients. Data from the CFS and CFS-PV indicated overall high agreement that caring was provided, however, both patients and nurses rated the delivery and receipt of SC lower than other dimensions of caring. Focus group data indicated that many nurses felt uncomfortable beginning conversations addressing SC even though they were comfortable addressing end-of-life care planning. As clinical experts, nurses suggested the need for education on SC, identification of system resources to support SC, and the importance of words, such as joy, peace, and comfort, in making SC delivery explicit. The SPIRITUALITY Model is suggested as an abbreviated spiritual tool to foster individualized care plan development.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:48Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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