2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164612
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
End of Life Task Force for the Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program
Author(s):
Privitere, Lisa; Kumpf, Rose; Yasko, Joyce; Spinuzza, Susan
Author Details:
Lisa Privitere, RN, OCN, Nurse Administrator, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: lisa.privitere@roswellpark.org; Rose Kumpf, RN; Lise Hernandez, RN, BSN, CHTC, CCRC; Joyce Yasko, PhD; Susan Spinuzza, RN
Abstract:
Administration/Leadership Development: The Blood and Marrow Program (BMT) provide care to a highrisk patient population over protracted periods of time. The Primary Care Team develops close therapeutic relationships with the patients as well as their families. When poor outcomes occur this has a significant and negative impact on the Primary Care Team most particularly the staff nurses who are present in the patient care environment around the clock. Very often the patients and their families depend on the staff nurses for ongoing support and guidance: this is not without a toll on the nurses. The BMT Program Administrators identified a need to address the significant effects of poor patient outcomes, most particularly noted when there was a trend in treating a younger patient population. The Task Force was developed as a means of addressing this issue. The intent was to assist members of the Team in developing healthy coping skills in response to difficult patient care scenarios. In addition, the secondary goal was to get the Team to have regular discussions about high risk patients. A third goal was to develop the skill of knowing when to initiate palliative treatment versus extraordinary treatment when the patient was dying. The Task Force meets monthly in an open structure allowing for any member of the Team to attend. The Team is free to discuss the care provided to patients and the appropriateness of active treatment in the light of potential futile outcomes. The Task Force is sensitive and responsive to the many emotions and feelings of the clinical team members during these meetings. The Task Force has held ongoing discussions for several months and positive feedback from the nursing staff has been received. An evaluation of turnover rates for staff nurses is proposed for the next phase of this program. Due to the high level of participation by the Team in the Task Force meetings it is apparent that this was a much needed intervention. The physician colleagues on the team have developed a greater appreciation for the impact of caring for high risk patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnd of Life Task Force for the Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPrivitere, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKumpf, Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorYasko, Joyceen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpinuzza, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsLisa Privitere, RN, OCN, Nurse Administrator, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York, USA, email: lisa.privitere@roswellpark.org; Rose Kumpf, RN; Lise Hernandez, RN, BSN, CHTC, CCRC; Joyce Yasko, PhD; Susan Spinuzza, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164612-
dc.description.abstractAdministration/Leadership Development: The Blood and Marrow Program (BMT) provide care to a highrisk patient population over protracted periods of time. The Primary Care Team develops close therapeutic relationships with the patients as well as their families. When poor outcomes occur this has a significant and negative impact on the Primary Care Team most particularly the staff nurses who are present in the patient care environment around the clock. Very often the patients and their families depend on the staff nurses for ongoing support and guidance: this is not without a toll on the nurses. The BMT Program Administrators identified a need to address the significant effects of poor patient outcomes, most particularly noted when there was a trend in treating a younger patient population. The Task Force was developed as a means of addressing this issue. The intent was to assist members of the Team in developing healthy coping skills in response to difficult patient care scenarios. In addition, the secondary goal was to get the Team to have regular discussions about high risk patients. A third goal was to develop the skill of knowing when to initiate palliative treatment versus extraordinary treatment when the patient was dying. The Task Force meets monthly in an open structure allowing for any member of the Team to attend. The Team is free to discuss the care provided to patients and the appropriateness of active treatment in the light of potential futile outcomes. The Task Force is sensitive and responsive to the many emotions and feelings of the clinical team members during these meetings. The Task Force has held ongoing discussions for several months and positive feedback from the nursing staff has been received. An evaluation of turnover rates for staff nurses is proposed for the next phase of this program. Due to the high level of participation by the Team in the Task Force meetings it is apparent that this was a much needed intervention. The physician colleagues on the team have developed a greater appreciation for the impact of caring for high risk patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:51Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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