Under-representation of African-Americans in Cancer Clinical Trials: Application of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Framework

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164619
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Under-representation of African-Americans in Cancer Clinical Trials: Application of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Framework
Author(s):
Waite, Terease
Author Details:
Terease Waite, BSN, RN, JD, Staff Nurse, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: Terese.Waite@uphs.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Research Study: As defined by the National Institutes of Health, a cancer disparity represents adverse differences in cancer incidence, prevalence, mortality, survival burden, or other health-related conditions. For the years 1974 through 2003, the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Programs (SEER) indicated that, though a minority population in the U.S., African Americans outpace Caucasians in cancer incidence and cancer mortality, while lagging in cancer survival. The significant under-representation of African American cancer patients in cancer clinical trials is a little recognized, but serious public health problem. Because cancer clinical trials improve therapeutic outcomes, advance treatment, and promote prevention, progress in the treatment of cancer and reduction of cancer disparities in African Americans is best accomplished by recruitment and accrual of more African Americans in cancer clinical trials. Research indicates that the underpinnigs for cancer disparity among African Americans is multifactorial. The aim of this poster presentation is to (1) discuss the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework for designing, implementing, and evaluating proposed interventions for reducing cancer disparity by increasing recruitment and accrual of African American cancer patients in cancer clinical trials and (2) outline a proposed, combined qualitative/quantitative research design for execution of Phase I of the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework. PRECEDE-PROCEED employs a multifactorial analysis which will encompass the biologic, epidemiologic, sociologic, political and economic factors affecting African American cancer patient participation in cancer clinical trials. Visual presentation of (1) the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework as applied to reduction of cancer disparity in African Americans, (2) a proposed qualitative/quantitative research design to be used in Phase I of the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework involving small focus groups of African American cancer patients and utilizing a short, semi-structured, open-ended interview tool to determine (1) their knowledge and understanding of clinical trials, (2) their attitudes toward clinical trials, (3) the factors influencing their decisions to refuse participation in cancer clinical trials, or to participate in and remain in cancer clinical trials, and (4) their feelings and perceptions about participation in cancer clinical trials. The Precede-Proceed framework is a comprehensive methodology useful in planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating research targeting recruitment and accrual of African American cancer patients in cancer clinical trials. Its multi-factorial analysis facilitates reduction of cancer disparity at the individual and community level.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2009
Conference Name:
34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnder-representation of African-Americans in Cancer Clinical Trials: Application of the PRECEDE-PROCEED Frameworken_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaite, Tereaseen_US
dc.author.detailsTerease Waite, BSN, RN, JD, Staff Nurse, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: Terese.Waite@uphs.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164619-
dc.description.abstractResearch Study: As defined by the National Institutes of Health, a cancer disparity represents adverse differences in cancer incidence, prevalence, mortality, survival burden, or other health-related conditions. For the years 1974 through 2003, the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Programs (SEER) indicated that, though a minority population in the U.S., African Americans outpace Caucasians in cancer incidence and cancer mortality, while lagging in cancer survival. The significant under-representation of African American cancer patients in cancer clinical trials is a little recognized, but serious public health problem. Because cancer clinical trials improve therapeutic outcomes, advance treatment, and promote prevention, progress in the treatment of cancer and reduction of cancer disparities in African Americans is best accomplished by recruitment and accrual of more African Americans in cancer clinical trials. Research indicates that the underpinnigs for cancer disparity among African Americans is multifactorial. The aim of this poster presentation is to (1) discuss the applicability of the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework for designing, implementing, and evaluating proposed interventions for reducing cancer disparity by increasing recruitment and accrual of African American cancer patients in cancer clinical trials and (2) outline a proposed, combined qualitative/quantitative research design for execution of Phase I of the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework. PRECEDE-PROCEED employs a multifactorial analysis which will encompass the biologic, epidemiologic, sociologic, political and economic factors affecting African American cancer patient participation in cancer clinical trials. Visual presentation of (1) the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework as applied to reduction of cancer disparity in African Americans, (2) a proposed qualitative/quantitative research design to be used in Phase I of the PRECEDE-PROCEED framework involving small focus groups of African American cancer patients and utilizing a short, semi-structured, open-ended interview tool to determine (1) their knowledge and understanding of clinical trials, (2) their attitudes toward clinical trials, (3) the factors influencing their decisions to refuse participation in cancer clinical trials, or to participate in and remain in cancer clinical trials, and (4) their feelings and perceptions about participation in cancer clinical trials. The Precede-Proceed framework is a comprehensive methodology useful in planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating research targeting recruitment and accrual of African American cancer patients in cancer clinical trials. Its multi-factorial analysis facilitates reduction of cancer disparity at the individual and community level.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:03:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:03:59Z-
dc.conference.date2009en_US
dc.conference.name34th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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