2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164623
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Vaccine Therapy: A Novel Approach for Treating Mantle Cell Lymphoma
Author(s):
Stryker, Virginia
Author Details:
Virginia Stryker, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA
Abstract:
Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is often highly aggressive and currently has no definitive cure. Approximately 2.5%-4% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas diagnosed in the United States are of the mantle cell variety, with a median survival of three to four years. Histologically, MCL is characterized by abnormal lymphoid cells with decreased cytoplasm and indented nuclei, as well as expansion of the mantle zone area of the affected lymph node. The clinical course varies, but the disease is generally aggressive with classic "B" symptoms (fevers, night sweats, weight loss) as the first presenting sign. Traditional therapies, such as intensive chemotherapy regimens, monoclonal antibodies, and bone marrow transplant initially achieve good disease response, but have not been shown to significantly improve long term survival. A clinical trial is currently underway at the National Institutes of Health to increase the median progression free survival of patients with MCL. While on study, the patient receives six cycles of Rituximab/EPOCH followed by five cycles of idiotype vaccine combined with GMCSF. The ultimate goal of the vaccine, which is created from a sample of the patient's own tumor prior to beginning therapy, is to stimulate and enhance a tumor specific T-cell response. After demonstrating competence in the specific injection technique required by the research protocol, ambulatory care oncology nurses administer the vaccine, monitor patient response, and provide comprehensive patient education. This poster will detail the treatment of MCL at the National Institutes of Health with a particular emphasis on vaccine administration and the necessary patient and nurse education involved in this mode of therapy. By sharing this information, we hope to increase oncology nurse understanding of MCL and the use of vaccines as a novel treatment approach.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVaccine Therapy: A Novel Approach for Treating Mantle Cell Lymphomaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStryker, Virginiaen_US
dc.author.detailsVirginia Stryker, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164623-
dc.description.abstractMantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma that is often highly aggressive and currently has no definitive cure. Approximately 2.5%-4% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas diagnosed in the United States are of the mantle cell variety, with a median survival of three to four years. Histologically, MCL is characterized by abnormal lymphoid cells with decreased cytoplasm and indented nuclei, as well as expansion of the mantle zone area of the affected lymph node. The clinical course varies, but the disease is generally aggressive with classic "B" symptoms (fevers, night sweats, weight loss) as the first presenting sign. Traditional therapies, such as intensive chemotherapy regimens, monoclonal antibodies, and bone marrow transplant initially achieve good disease response, but have not been shown to significantly improve long term survival. A clinical trial is currently underway at the National Institutes of Health to increase the median progression free survival of patients with MCL. While on study, the patient receives six cycles of Rituximab/EPOCH followed by five cycles of idiotype vaccine combined with GMCSF. The ultimate goal of the vaccine, which is created from a sample of the patient's own tumor prior to beginning therapy, is to stimulate and enhance a tumor specific T-cell response. After demonstrating competence in the specific injection technique required by the research protocol, ambulatory care oncology nurses administer the vaccine, monitor patient response, and provide comprehensive patient education. This poster will detail the treatment of MCL at the National Institutes of Health with a particular emphasis on vaccine administration and the necessary patient and nurse education involved in this mode of therapy. By sharing this information, we hope to increase oncology nurse understanding of MCL and the use of vaccines as a novel treatment approach.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:03Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.