2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164629
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Information Needs of Patients With Cancer in Korea
Author(s):
Hur, Hea
Author Details:
Hea Hur, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, School of Nursing, Sodaemoon-gu, Seoul, South Korea, email: hhk0384@wonju.yonsei.ac.kr
Abstract:
Nursing interventions such as giving information may help people with cancer to have realistic expectations about their illness and ill-related events. The extent of an individual's desire for information may vary throughout the course of the disease. The purpose of this study was to explore what particular types of information were important to patients during their treatment for cancer. Seventy three patients with cancer at our patient clinic in W. Christian Hospital, Korea responded to the structured questionnaire developed by investigators based on the literature and the interview of patients with cancer. The interviews were used in this study. The findings in this study showed that all patients indicated a slightly strong need for information. There was not a significant relationship between the score of information needs with duration of cancer. However, there was a significantly negative relationship between age and the total score of information needs (r = -.31, p < .05). The top priorities of information needs were the signs and symptoms of recurrence, the follow-up schedule after finishing the cycle of treatment, what kind of complications of treatment and how to manage them, and the possibility of metastasis. How to manage the relationship between husband and wife was ranked the lowest. The results suggest that nurses first should identify specific informational needs, the timing of such needs, and should provide appropriate information how these needs could best be met.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInformation Needs of Patients With Cancer in Koreaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHur, Heaen_US
dc.author.detailsHea Hur, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, School of Nursing, Sodaemoon-gu, Seoul, South Korea, email: hhk0384@wonju.yonsei.ac.kren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164629-
dc.description.abstractNursing interventions such as giving information may help people with cancer to have realistic expectations about their illness and ill-related events. The extent of an individual's desire for information may vary throughout the course of the disease. The purpose of this study was to explore what particular types of information were important to patients during their treatment for cancer. Seventy three patients with cancer at our patient clinic in W. Christian Hospital, Korea responded to the structured questionnaire developed by investigators based on the literature and the interview of patients with cancer. The interviews were used in this study. The findings in this study showed that all patients indicated a slightly strong need for information. There was not a significant relationship between the score of information needs with duration of cancer. However, there was a significantly negative relationship between age and the total score of information needs (r = -.31, p &lt; .05). The top priorities of information needs were the signs and symptoms of recurrence, the follow-up schedule after finishing the cycle of treatment, what kind of complications of treatment and how to manage them, and the possibility of metastasis. How to manage the relationship between husband and wife was ranked the lowest. The results suggest that nurses first should identify specific informational needs, the timing of such needs, and should provide appropriate information how these needs could best be met.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:09Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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