2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164631
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Frequent Defecation After Ttreatment for Colorectal Cancer
Author(s):
Bisanz, Annette
Author Details:
Annette Bisanz, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA
Abstract:
Patients who have had treatment for colorectal cancer experience frequent defecation that can be differentiated from diarrhea based on the more formed consistency of the stool. A literature review revealed that insoluble fiber can be used to either speed up or slow gastrointestinal motility. After piloting a protocol for remedying this symptom and finding it successful in compliant patients, we established a standard of practice. This standard of care was made part of a surgical pathway and included patient education and nursing guidance, and decreased the number of stools per day and enhanced the quality of the patients' lives. Patients were taught to take a small amount of psyllium in very little water so that it acted like a sponge in the gut, absorbing excess fluid and thereby slowing the transit time and to titrate the amount of food, fluid, fiber, and medication they consume. When the number of stools begins to decrease and the stool becomes more formed, the patients were put on a bowel training program to empty the content of the colon at an expected time each day. Patients with incontinence were taught anal sphincter exercises to strengthen the anal sphincter. Maintaining anal sphincter strength is important while a temporary diverting ileostomy is in place so that at the time of reversal, the anal sphincter is in good condition. The outcomes experienced have been favorable in compliant patients. Patients can reduce their defecation from 30 stools per day to three per day on this bowel program. Accomplishing the desired outcomes requires ongoing nursing assessment and problem solving with the patient to achieve adequate results. The outcomes are remarkable, allowing patients to go back to work, socialize, and regain a quality of life not possible when they are confined to the home because of frequent defecation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManaging Frequent Defecation After Ttreatment for Colorectal Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorBisanz, Annetteen_US
dc.author.detailsAnnette Bisanz, University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164631-
dc.description.abstractPatients who have had treatment for colorectal cancer experience frequent defecation that can be differentiated from diarrhea based on the more formed consistency of the stool. A literature review revealed that insoluble fiber can be used to either speed up or slow gastrointestinal motility. After piloting a protocol for remedying this symptom and finding it successful in compliant patients, we established a standard of practice. This standard of care was made part of a surgical pathway and included patient education and nursing guidance, and decreased the number of stools per day and enhanced the quality of the patients' lives. Patients were taught to take a small amount of psyllium in very little water so that it acted like a sponge in the gut, absorbing excess fluid and thereby slowing the transit time and to titrate the amount of food, fluid, fiber, and medication they consume. When the number of stools begins to decrease and the stool becomes more formed, the patients were put on a bowel training program to empty the content of the colon at an expected time each day. Patients with incontinence were taught anal sphincter exercises to strengthen the anal sphincter. Maintaining anal sphincter strength is important while a temporary diverting ileostomy is in place so that at the time of reversal, the anal sphincter is in good condition. The outcomes experienced have been favorable in compliant patients. Patients can reduce their defecation from 30 stools per day to three per day on this bowel program. Accomplishing the desired outcomes requires ongoing nursing assessment and problem solving with the patient to achieve adequate results. The outcomes are remarkable, allowing patients to go back to work, socialize, and regain a quality of life not possible when they are confined to the home because of frequent defecation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:12Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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