Psychosocial Issues Associated With Increased Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164635
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychosocial Issues Associated With Increased Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk
Author(s):
Pasacreta, Jeannie
Author Details:
Jeannie Pasacreta, PhD, Associate Professor, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: jeannie.pasacreta@yale.edu
Abstract:
Background: Perception of genetic susceptibility may precipitate significant psychosocial sequelae. In order to develop effective breast cancer detection and prevention programs, it is essential to consider psychosocial issues that may foster or hinder utilization of genetic testing. Framework: Studies suggest that a crisis response precedes the clinical presentation of the disease once susceptibility is determined. Awareness of genetic risk may constitute the first point of crisis in the cancer trajectory even though a diagnosis may be years away or may not occur at all. Many women, in fact, experience psychological distress based on their family history and their subsequent determination of their vulnerability whether or not they actually seek genetic testing. The study aims were to describe the psychological characteristics of women at increased risk for developing breast or ovarian cancer and to distinguish women who obtained genetic testing from those who did not. Sample and Methods: Ninety-five women at increased risk for developing breast or ovarian cancer were surveyed using a mailed questionnaire to obtain demographic and psychological data. Subjects had at least two first-degree relatives with a history of breast or ovarian cancer and were recruited from a university affiliated cancer center. Results: Most participants were white, married, had children, were well educated, employed, and with a mean age of 49 years. All women had varied relatives with breast or ovarian cancer and one-third experienced the death of a relative from breast/ovarian cancer. The mean score on the CES-D depression scale was 19.3, exceeding the cutoff score for clinical depression (mean = 16). Global psychological distress as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory was significantly higher than in the general population. Variables that characterized women who actually had predisposition genetic testing included lower perceived risk of developing breast cancer, not having a mother with a history of breast cancer, having a sister with a history of ovarian cancer, experiencing the death of a relative, lower overall psychological distress, and lower depression. Implications: Depression and psychological distress in these women are profound, thus psychosocial problems must be ascertained so that targeted interventions can be instituted early in the lengthening cancer trajectory.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychosocial Issues Associated With Increased Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risken_GB
dc.contributor.authorPasacreta, Jeannieen_US
dc.author.detailsJeannie Pasacreta, PhD, Associate Professor, Yale University, School of Nursing, New Haven, Connecticut, USA, email: jeannie.pasacreta@yale.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164635-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Perception of genetic susceptibility may precipitate significant psychosocial sequelae. In order to develop effective breast cancer detection and prevention programs, it is essential to consider psychosocial issues that may foster or hinder utilization of genetic testing. Framework: Studies suggest that a crisis response precedes the clinical presentation of the disease once susceptibility is determined. Awareness of genetic risk may constitute the first point of crisis in the cancer trajectory even though a diagnosis may be years away or may not occur at all. Many women, in fact, experience psychological distress based on their family history and their subsequent determination of their vulnerability whether or not they actually seek genetic testing. The study aims were to describe the psychological characteristics of women at increased risk for developing breast or ovarian cancer and to distinguish women who obtained genetic testing from those who did not. Sample and Methods: Ninety-five women at increased risk for developing breast or ovarian cancer were surveyed using a mailed questionnaire to obtain demographic and psychological data. Subjects had at least two first-degree relatives with a history of breast or ovarian cancer and were recruited from a university affiliated cancer center. Results: Most participants were white, married, had children, were well educated, employed, and with a mean age of 49 years. All women had varied relatives with breast or ovarian cancer and one-third experienced the death of a relative from breast/ovarian cancer. The mean score on the CES-D depression scale was 19.3, exceeding the cutoff score for clinical depression (mean = 16). Global psychological distress as measured by the Brief Symptom Inventory was significantly higher than in the general population. Variables that characterized women who actually had predisposition genetic testing included lower perceived risk of developing breast cancer, not having a mother with a history of breast cancer, having a sister with a history of ovarian cancer, experiencing the death of a relative, lower overall psychological distress, and lower depression. Implications: Depression and psychological distress in these women are profound, thus psychosocial problems must be ascertained so that targeted interventions can be instituted early in the lengthening cancer trajectory.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:16Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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