2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164636
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Chemotherapy Symptom Distress: Impact on Quality of Life
Author(s):
Wann, Li-Chen
Author Details:
Li-Chen Wann, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
Individuals diagnosed with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy will experience a variety of symptoms based on their diagnosis and treatment which will subsequently impact their quality of life (QOL). While the incidence of symptoms common to chemotherapy is well known, the distress that individuals perceive from these symptoms is less clear. This descriptive study is an interdisciplinary team response to the challenges associated with the restructuring of healthcare delivery in meeting patient needs in both inpatient and ambulatory settings. The framework used to guide this study is the Model of Symptom Management (Dodd et al., 2001), a comprehensive QOL model that considers the person, environment, and health/illness factors that influence the symptom experience of patients undergoing chemotherapy. The dimensions of QOL related to chemotherapy in this framework are the physical, psychological, and social aspects of caring. Using a longitudinal, descriptive design, data are collected from a mixed cancer sample stratified to four groups classified by type of chemotherapy. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale - Short Form (MSAS SF, Chang et al. 2000) captures the patients perception of physical and psychological symptom distress, and the Social Support Network Inventory (SSNI, Flaherty & Gaviria, 1981]) captures the patients perception of social support. Demographics are collected. A treatment form includes diagnosis, stage of disease, and chemotherapy regimen. The data collection points are prior to the start of the first chemotherapy cycle, midway, at completion of the regimen, and at recovery. With 15 patients per group, the 95% C.I. has a half-width of 0.5 SD. A polynomial function of time will be fit to the scores using a mixed model where time is a fixed effect and the patients are the random effects. This data will provide information regarding chemotherapy impact on QOL and will be used as a guideline to assess existing patient teaching strategies and need for supportive services. Findings will be presented to appropriate committee's to identify and develop a plan to meet these needs. The need for controlled randomized clinical trials, essential to determine which interventions are most effective in improving QOL outcomes, can then be examined.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChemotherapy Symptom Distress: Impact on Quality of Lifeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWann, Li-Chenen_US
dc.author.detailsLi-Chen Wann, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164636-
dc.description.abstractIndividuals diagnosed with cancer who are undergoing chemotherapy will experience a variety of symptoms based on their diagnosis and treatment which will subsequently impact their quality of life (QOL). While the incidence of symptoms common to chemotherapy is well known, the distress that individuals perceive from these symptoms is less clear. This descriptive study is an interdisciplinary team response to the challenges associated with the restructuring of healthcare delivery in meeting patient needs in both inpatient and ambulatory settings. The framework used to guide this study is the Model of Symptom Management (Dodd et al., 2001), a comprehensive QOL model that considers the person, environment, and health/illness factors that influence the symptom experience of patients undergoing chemotherapy. The dimensions of QOL related to chemotherapy in this framework are the physical, psychological, and social aspects of caring. Using a longitudinal, descriptive design, data are collected from a mixed cancer sample stratified to four groups classified by type of chemotherapy. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale - Short Form (MSAS SF, Chang et al. 2000) captures the patients perception of physical and psychological symptom distress, and the Social Support Network Inventory (SSNI, Flaherty & Gaviria, 1981]) captures the patients perception of social support. Demographics are collected. A treatment form includes diagnosis, stage of disease, and chemotherapy regimen. The data collection points are prior to the start of the first chemotherapy cycle, midway, at completion of the regimen, and at recovery. With 15 patients per group, the 95% C.I. has a half-width of 0.5 SD. A polynomial function of time will be fit to the scores using a mixed model where time is a fixed effect and the patients are the random effects. This data will provide information regarding chemotherapy impact on QOL and will be used as a guideline to assess existing patient teaching strategies and need for supportive services. Findings will be presented to appropriate committee's to identify and develop a plan to meet these needs. The need for controlled randomized clinical trials, essential to determine which interventions are most effective in improving QOL outcomes, can then be examined.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:17Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.