Quality-of-Life Issues in Ovarian Cancer: "Conversations!" With 21,806 Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164637
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Quality-of-Life Issues in Ovarian Cancer: "Conversations!" With 21,806 Women
Author(s):
Ferrell, Betty
Author Details:
Betty Ferrell, PhD, Research Scientist, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: bferrell@smtplink.coh.org
Abstract:
Quality of life (QOL) concerns are prominent for the 23,400 women in the United States who will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year and for the 13,900 women who will die of this disease in 2001. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe QOL concerns and experiences in women with ovarian cancer in order to advance future care. The conceptual framework for the study was the model of QOL in Cancer Survivors developed by Ferrell, Dow, and Grant (1999). The model encompasses four dimensions of physical, psychosocial, social, and spiritual well being. The study methods were based on qualitative research procedures of ethnography (Leininger, 1985) involving the study of the culture of mutual support offered by ovarian cancer survivors. The data was received from women with ovarian cancer who corresponded through an ovarian support newsletter, "Conversations!". The correspondence (n = 21, 826) occurred from 1990-2000. Analysis procedures included data reduction and content analysis using the QOL model as a guiding framework. An expert panel of nurse experts in ovarian cancer, QOL, and an ovarian cancer survivor validated the coding. Findings based on major themes derived from the analysis include intense expressions of pain and fatigue as symptoms of their primary disease as well as the result of treatment. Fears of recurrence and distress over treatments are coupled with profoundly candid explanations of methods to cope and maintain hope. The overwhelming support that these women are receiving from their family and friends is not successful in alleviating feelings of isolation, and the need to confide in other survivors who identify with their personal battle. Faith in God for comfort and healing is strong in the vast majority of the letters as well as the meaning that they have found in illness and its ability to enact positive changes in their lives. Implications: This study provided a rare opportunity for an ethnographic exploration of QOL from the naturalistic correspondence between women with ovarian cancer. The findings serve as a voice for women with ovarian cancer to share their experiences from diagnosis through treatment, survivorship, or advanced disease and death.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2002
Conference Name:
27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Washington, D.C., USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQuality-of-Life Issues in Ovarian Cancer: "Conversations!" With 21,806 Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFerrell, Bettyen_US
dc.author.detailsBetty Ferrell, PhD, Research Scientist, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA, email: bferrell@smtplink.coh.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164637-
dc.description.abstractQuality of life (QOL) concerns are prominent for the 23,400 women in the United States who will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer this year and for the 13,900 women who will die of this disease in 2001. The purpose of this qualitative study was to describe QOL concerns and experiences in women with ovarian cancer in order to advance future care. The conceptual framework for the study was the model of QOL in Cancer Survivors developed by Ferrell, Dow, and Grant (1999). The model encompasses four dimensions of physical, psychosocial, social, and spiritual well being. The study methods were based on qualitative research procedures of ethnography (Leininger, 1985) involving the study of the culture of mutual support offered by ovarian cancer survivors. The data was received from women with ovarian cancer who corresponded through an ovarian support newsletter, "Conversations!". The correspondence (n = 21, 826) occurred from 1990-2000. Analysis procedures included data reduction and content analysis using the QOL model as a guiding framework. An expert panel of nurse experts in ovarian cancer, QOL, and an ovarian cancer survivor validated the coding. Findings based on major themes derived from the analysis include intense expressions of pain and fatigue as symptoms of their primary disease as well as the result of treatment. Fears of recurrence and distress over treatments are coupled with profoundly candid explanations of methods to cope and maintain hope. The overwhelming support that these women are receiving from their family and friends is not successful in alleviating feelings of isolation, and the need to confide in other survivors who identify with their personal battle. Faith in God for comfort and healing is strong in the vast majority of the letters as well as the meaning that they have found in illness and its ability to enact positive changes in their lives. Implications: This study provided a rare opportunity for an ethnographic exploration of QOL from the naturalistic correspondence between women with ovarian cancer. The findings serve as a voice for women with ovarian cancer to share their experiences from diagnosis through treatment, survivorship, or advanced disease and death.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:18Z-
dc.conference.date2002en_US
dc.conference.name27th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationWashington, D.C., USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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