Respiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Status of Survivors of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164639
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Respiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Status of Survivors of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Author(s):
Sarna, L.; Padilla, Geraldine; Holmes, C.; Brecht, M.; Evangelista, L.; Tashkin, D.
Author Details:
L. Sarna, University of California, Los Angeles School of Nursing, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: Lsarna@sonnet.ucla.edu; Geraldine Padilla; C. Holmes; M. Brecht; L. Evangelista; D. Tashkin
Abstract:
Respiratory symptoms and pulmonary status of long-term survivors of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the impact of these consequences on quality of life (QOL) have not been reported. Purpose: to describe the pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms among long-term survivors of NSCLC and their relationship to QOL. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey of 5-year minimum survivors of NSCLC (n = 142), the majority (54%) female, average age 71 years. A multidimensional model of QOL served as the conceptual framework. Assessments included self-reported demographic and health status variables, frequency of respiratory symptoms as measured by the American Thoracic Society, the Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and hand-held spirometry. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression to determine risk factors associated with presence of symptoms; multiple regression was used to examine the contribution of variables to dimensions of QOL. Results: Survivors described an average of 1.3 (SD 1.2) symptoms: 25% cough, 28% phlegm, 31% wheezing, and 39% dyspnea at rest. The majority of those reporting cough also reported phlegm, wheezing, and dyspnea at rest. Thirty percent reported that they spent most of the day in bed because of respiratory symptoms; 22% had < 50% FEV1 % predicted; and based upon spirometry results, 50%, severe obstructive/restrictive disease. Risk of symptoms included use of bronchodilators (cough, OR = 2.9, wheeze, OR = 4.7), gender (phlegm, OR = .42), current smoking (phlegm, OR = 3.40), moderate/severe ventilatory disease (phlegm, OR = 2.5, wheeze, OR = 2.5, dyspnea at rest, OR = 3.5), comorbid conditions (dyspnea at rest, OR = 1.4), and exposure to second-hand smoke (presence of respiratory symptoms, OR= 3.6). Marital status, comorbid conditions, number of respiratory symptoms, and dyspnea at rest contributed to physical functioning (R2 = .38) and, excluding number of symptoms, to physical role-limits (R2 = .27). Comorbid conditions, respiratory symptoms, and presence of cough and phlegm > 3 months contributed to general health perceptions (R2 = .26). Our findings suggest that the majority of survivors have few respiratory symptoms, but 50% have significant pulmonary impairment. Assessment of potential risk factors and management of respiratory symptoms is essential for survivors of NSCLC.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRespiratory Symptoms and Pulmonary Status of Survivors of Non-Small Cell Lung Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSarna, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPadilla, Geraldineen_US
dc.contributor.authorHolmes, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrecht, M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEvangelista, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTashkin, D.en_US
dc.author.detailsL. Sarna, University of California, Los Angeles School of Nursing, Los Angeles, California, USA, email: Lsarna@sonnet.ucla.edu; Geraldine Padilla; C. Holmes; M. Brecht; L. Evangelista; D. Tashkinen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164639-
dc.description.abstractRespiratory symptoms and pulmonary status of long-term survivors of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the impact of these consequences on quality of life (QOL) have not been reported. Purpose: to describe the pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms among long-term survivors of NSCLC and their relationship to QOL. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey of 5-year minimum survivors of NSCLC (n = 142), the majority (54%) female, average age 71 years. A multidimensional model of QOL served as the conceptual framework. Assessments included self-reported demographic and health status variables, frequency of respiratory symptoms as measured by the American Thoracic Society, the Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and hand-held spirometry. Data were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression to determine risk factors associated with presence of symptoms; multiple regression was used to examine the contribution of variables to dimensions of QOL. Results: Survivors described an average of 1.3 (SD 1.2) symptoms: 25% cough, 28% phlegm, 31% wheezing, and 39% dyspnea at rest. The majority of those reporting cough also reported phlegm, wheezing, and dyspnea at rest. Thirty percent reported that they spent most of the day in bed because of respiratory symptoms; 22% had &lt; 50% FEV1 % predicted; and based upon spirometry results, 50%, severe obstructive/restrictive disease. Risk of symptoms included use of bronchodilators (cough, OR = 2.9, wheeze, OR = 4.7), gender (phlegm, OR = .42), current smoking (phlegm, OR = 3.40), moderate/severe ventilatory disease (phlegm, OR = 2.5, wheeze, OR = 2.5, dyspnea at rest, OR = 3.5), comorbid conditions (dyspnea at rest, OR = 1.4), and exposure to second-hand smoke (presence of respiratory symptoms, OR= 3.6). Marital status, comorbid conditions, number of respiratory symptoms, and dyspnea at rest contributed to physical functioning (R2 = .38) and, excluding number of symptoms, to physical role-limits (R2 = .27). Comorbid conditions, respiratory symptoms, and presence of cough and phlegm &gt; 3 months contributed to general health perceptions (R2 = .26). Our findings suggest that the majority of survivors have few respiratory symptoms, but 50% have significant pulmonary impairment. Assessment of potential risk factors and management of respiratory symptoms is essential for survivors of NSCLC.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:20Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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