2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164641
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relief From Hot Flashes: Defining Distress and Satisfaction
Author(s):
Barton, D.; Parkinson, J.; Loprinzi, C.; Sloan, J.; Novotny, P.
Author Details:
D. Barton, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, J. Parkinson; C. Loprinzi; J. Sloan; P. Novotny
Abstract:
Although menopause is an expected event in the natural life of a woman, premature menopause induced by treatment for breast cancer can be a distressing experience. Previous research has shown that breast cancer survivors can experience more frequent, more severe, and more distressing hot flashes than women going through natural menopause. Even effective nonhormonal treatments do not reduce hot flashes by the 80% or more seen with hormonal treatments, and some have unwanted side effects. Therefore, it would help to understand more about what variables are associated with distress related to hot flashes as well as satisfaction with treatment. The purposes of these pilot studies was to find predictors of satisfaction with hot flash treatment and predictors of distress related to hot flashes. The sample included 62 women who participated in one of 4 pilot studies with new medications for hot flashes. Forty-nine percent of the women had a history of breast cancer, with a mean age of 56 and were from 6 outpatient oncology clinics in the Midwest. Self-report questionnaires were completed at baseline and weekly during the medication for a total of 5 weeks. Validated hot flash diaries and numerical analogue scale questions (Cronbach alphas ranged from .80 - .84) were used to assess satisfaction and the severity of various symptoms related to menopause as well as side effects of the medications. Data were analyzed using Pearson Correlations and univariate regression equations. Dependent variables were distress and satisfaction. Independent variables were hot flash score, frequency, average severity, type of treatment and symptom score. Results indicate percent of baseline hot flash score predicted satisfaction with treatment. At baseline, frequency and symptom score were significant predictors of distress, with symptom score accounting for 17% of the variance. Many of the symptoms reported at baseline were related to sleep and fatigue problems. Implications of these results are that both frequency and severity are important considerations in hot flash management. Hot flash associated symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, are important to assess as they may be indicative of distress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelief From Hot Flashes: Defining Distress and Satisfactionen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarton, D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorParkinson, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLoprinzi, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSloan, J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorNovotny, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsD. Barton, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA, J. Parkinson; C. Loprinzi; J. Sloan; P. Novotnyen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164641-
dc.description.abstractAlthough menopause is an expected event in the natural life of a woman, premature menopause induced by treatment for breast cancer can be a distressing experience. Previous research has shown that breast cancer survivors can experience more frequent, more severe, and more distressing hot flashes than women going through natural menopause. Even effective nonhormonal treatments do not reduce hot flashes by the 80% or more seen with hormonal treatments, and some have unwanted side effects. Therefore, it would help to understand more about what variables are associated with distress related to hot flashes as well as satisfaction with treatment. The purposes of these pilot studies was to find predictors of satisfaction with hot flash treatment and predictors of distress related to hot flashes. The sample included 62 women who participated in one of 4 pilot studies with new medications for hot flashes. Forty-nine percent of the women had a history of breast cancer, with a mean age of 56 and were from 6 outpatient oncology clinics in the Midwest. Self-report questionnaires were completed at baseline and weekly during the medication for a total of 5 weeks. Validated hot flash diaries and numerical analogue scale questions (Cronbach alphas ranged from .80 - .84) were used to assess satisfaction and the severity of various symptoms related to menopause as well as side effects of the medications. Data were analyzed using Pearson Correlations and univariate regression equations. Dependent variables were distress and satisfaction. Independent variables were hot flash score, frequency, average severity, type of treatment and symptom score. Results indicate percent of baseline hot flash score predicted satisfaction with treatment. At baseline, frequency and symptom score were significant predictors of distress, with symptom score accounting for 17% of the variance. Many of the symptoms reported at baseline were related to sleep and fatigue problems. Implications of these results are that both frequency and severity are important considerations in hot flash management. Hot flash associated symptoms, such as sleep disturbances, are important to assess as they may be indicative of distress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:22Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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