Factors Associated With Fatigue in Women Before and After Surgery for Breast Cancer

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164642
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Associated With Fatigue in Women Before and After Surgery for Breast Cancer
Author(s):
Dean, G.; Sarna, L.; Grant, M.
Author Details:
G. Dean, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA; L. Sarna; M. Grant
Abstract:
SIGNIFICANCE: While significant literature supports the occurrence and distress of cancer treatment-related fatigue and fatigue in advanced cancer, little evidence is available on the newly diagnosed cancer patient. PURPOSE: This study explored the occurrence of fatigue and relationship of mood and symptom distress on fatigue in women before and one month after surgery for breast cancer. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK. Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model was used to guide this study. METHODS: A descriptive prospective one group pre-post design was used to describe changes in and relationships between fatigue, mood and symptom distress. Twenty women scheduled for breast cancer surgery were recruited from a cancer center in Southern California. Data were collected on fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale, Profile of Mood States fatigue and vigor subscales) mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and symptom distress (Symptom Distress scale=SDS). Higher scores indicate more fatigue, negative mood and more symptom distress. DATA ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics, correlations and paired t-tests were used for the analysis. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: Mean scores for fatigue revealed nonsignificant differences (4.63 pre-op to 4.68 postop; p=0.94). Mean scores for anxiety decreased significantly (9.25 pre-op to 7.26 postop; p<0.02). Anxiety subscale scores of 11 or greater (need further evaluation) were found in 10 (50%) participants pre-operatively and only 4 (20%) participants postoperatively. Mean scores for depression revealed nonsignificant differences (5.50 pre-op to 5.42 postop; p<0.79). Depression subscale scores of 11 or greater (need further evaluation) were found in 3 (15%) participants pre-operatively and 2 (10%) participants postoperatively. Mean scores for the SDS demonstrated nonsignificant differences (23.05 pre-op to 23.89 postop; p<0.84). Three symptoms reported with greater frequency and varying levels of distress both pre- and postoperatively were: outlook, insomnia and fatigue. Fatigue, mood and symptom distress were moderately to highly correlated. These results confirm previous research findings on newly diagnosed women with breast cancer (Cimprich, 1999).
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2003
Conference Name:
28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Denver, Colorado, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Associated With Fatigue in Women Before and After Surgery for Breast Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorDean, G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSarna, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrant, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsG. Dean, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA; L. Sarna; M. Granten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164642-
dc.description.abstractSIGNIFICANCE: While significant literature supports the occurrence and distress of cancer treatment-related fatigue and fatigue in advanced cancer, little evidence is available on the newly diagnosed cancer patient. PURPOSE: This study explored the occurrence of fatigue and relationship of mood and symptom distress on fatigue in women before and one month after surgery for breast cancer. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK. Piper's Integrated Fatigue Model was used to guide this study. METHODS: A descriptive prospective one group pre-post design was used to describe changes in and relationships between fatigue, mood and symptom distress. Twenty women scheduled for breast cancer surgery were recruited from a cancer center in Southern California. Data were collected on fatigue (Piper Fatigue Scale, Profile of Mood States fatigue and vigor subscales) mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and symptom distress (Symptom Distress scale=SDS). Higher scores indicate more fatigue, negative mood and more symptom distress. DATA ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics, correlations and paired t-tests were used for the analysis. FINDINGS AND IMPLICATIONS: Mean scores for fatigue revealed nonsignificant differences (4.63 pre-op to 4.68 postop; p=0.94). Mean scores for anxiety decreased significantly (9.25 pre-op to 7.26 postop; p&lt;0.02). Anxiety subscale scores of 11 or greater (need further evaluation) were found in 10 (50%) participants pre-operatively and only 4 (20%) participants postoperatively. Mean scores for depression revealed nonsignificant differences (5.50 pre-op to 5.42 postop; p&lt;0.79). Depression subscale scores of 11 or greater (need further evaluation) were found in 3 (15%) participants pre-operatively and 2 (10%) participants postoperatively. Mean scores for the SDS demonstrated nonsignificant differences (23.05 pre-op to 23.89 postop; p&lt;0.84). Three symptoms reported with greater frequency and varying levels of distress both pre- and postoperatively were: outlook, insomnia and fatigue. Fatigue, mood and symptom distress were moderately to highly correlated. These results confirm previous research findings on newly diagnosed women with breast cancer (Cimprich, 1999).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:23Z-
dc.conference.date2003en_US
dc.conference.name28th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationDenver, Colorado, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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