Expressed Desire for Hastened Death in Seven Individuals Living with Advanced Cancer: A Phenomenological Inquiry

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164648
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Expressed Desire for Hastened Death in Seven Individuals Living with Advanced Cancer: A Phenomenological Inquiry
Author(s):
Coyle, N.
Author Details:
N. Coyle, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA
Abstract:
Patients living with advanced cancer sometimes express a desire for hastened death (DHD). Although there is a growing literature on desire for death in terminally ill cancer patients, limited in-depth research has been conducted that explores individual meanings and uses of an expressed DHD for the patient. Purpose: To explore the meanings and uses of an expressed DHD in patients living with advanced cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Phenomenological Inquiry. Methods: Advanced cancer patients who were followed by the Pain and Palliative Care Service of an urban cancer center and had expressed at least once a DHD were recruited. A series of in-depth semi-structured interviews were held with each patient focusing on their experience of living with advanced disease, and how it affected their attitudes towards life and death. The interview series stopped when cognitive impairment or death intervened or no new information was forthcoming. Twenty-five interviews were held with 7 patients (range 2-6). Patient recruitment continued during the interviewing process until no further themes emerged. Sample characteristics: Sex: males 4, females 3; age: range 45-78-yrs; Ethnicity: white 6, Hispanic 1; occupation: professionals 5, white/blue collar 2; cancer diagnoses: varied; religion: Jew 3, Catholic 2, Protestant 2. Data Analysis: Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, analyzed, coded, and organized into themes. Findings and Implications: Expression of a DHD had many uses and was a tool of communication indicating: (1) A manifestation of the will to live; (2) That the dying process was so difficult an early death was preferred; (3) The immediate situation was unendurable and required immediate action; (4) As an option to extract oneself from an unendurable situation; (5) A manifestation of the last control the dying can exert; (6) A way of drawing attention to "me as a unique individual"; (7) A gesture of altruism to the family; (8) A tool of manipulation of the family in order to avoid abandonment; (9) A despairing cry depicting the misery of the current situation. Findings support that an expressed DHD and desire for death are not the same.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExpressed Desire for Hastened Death in Seven Individuals Living with Advanced Cancer: A Phenomenological Inquiryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCoyle, N.en_US
dc.author.detailsN. Coyle, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164648-
dc.description.abstractPatients living with advanced cancer sometimes express a desire for hastened death (DHD). Although there is a growing literature on desire for death in terminally ill cancer patients, limited in-depth research has been conducted that explores individual meanings and uses of an expressed DHD for the patient. Purpose: To explore the meanings and uses of an expressed DHD in patients living with advanced cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: Phenomenological Inquiry. Methods: Advanced cancer patients who were followed by the Pain and Palliative Care Service of an urban cancer center and had expressed at least once a DHD were recruited. A series of in-depth semi-structured interviews were held with each patient focusing on their experience of living with advanced disease, and how it affected their attitudes towards life and death. The interview series stopped when cognitive impairment or death intervened or no new information was forthcoming. Twenty-five interviews were held with 7 patients (range 2-6). Patient recruitment continued during the interviewing process until no further themes emerged. Sample characteristics: Sex: males 4, females 3; age: range 45-78-yrs; Ethnicity: white 6, Hispanic 1; occupation: professionals 5, white/blue collar 2; cancer diagnoses: varied; religion: Jew 3, Catholic 2, Protestant 2. Data Analysis: Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, analyzed, coded, and organized into themes. Findings and Implications: Expression of a DHD had many uses and was a tool of communication indicating: (1) A manifestation of the will to live; (2) That the dying process was so difficult an early death was preferred; (3) The immediate situation was unendurable and required immediate action; (4) As an option to extract oneself from an unendurable situation; (5) A manifestation of the last control the dying can exert; (6) A way of drawing attention to "me as a unique individual"; (7) A gesture of altruism to the family; (8) A tool of manipulation of the family in order to avoid abandonment; (9) A despairing cry depicting the misery of the current situation. Findings support that an expressed DHD and desire for death are not the same.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:30Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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