Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patients Perception of the Quality of Information They Received Concerning the Sexual Side Effects of Chemotherapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164649
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patients Perception of the Quality of Information They Received Concerning the Sexual Side Effects of Chemotherapy
Author(s):
Galante, E.
Author Details:
E. Galante, Regional Oncology Hematology Associated of Delaware, Wilmington, Delaware, USA
Abstract:
The premenopausal breast cancer survivor's perception of the quality and quantity of education they received form their healthcare provider concerning the possible sexual side effects of chemotherapy. The oncology nurse is a unique position to affect a client's adaptation to the sexual side effects they may experience due to chemotherapy. Purpose: Sexuality and Sexual expression are an important aspect of a person's mental and physical well-being. Standard of care for many premenopausal breast cancer patients includes the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy. Many of these women will experience either temporary or permanent ovarian failure due to that chemotherapy. Sexual side effects and its impact on the quality of life for the breast cancer survivor have been well studied and reported in the literature. The client's perception of the availability of healthcare providers in discussing sexual issues has been less studied. The purpose of this study is to answer two research questions: 1) Do patients feel they received adequate information concerning the possible sexual side effects of chemotherapy from healthcare providers? 2) From whom and at what point in the cancer care continuum this information was obtained? Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Roy Adaptation Model was used as the study's conceptual framework. A diagnosis of cancer often brings with it a period of constant adaptation for the patient and family. The Roy Model has been shown to be effective in many areas of oncology nursing. A basic premise of the framework is that the individual is a biophychosocial being in constant interaction with a changing environment. At issue are the individual's adaptation to both internal and external stimuli and the nurse's role in helping the patient and family attain a level of adaptation that is satisfactory to them. Methods: This study is a retrospective, quantitative study. A 25 item, five point Likert scale questionnaire was developed. The questionnaire was then reviewed for readability, ease of administration and sensitivity with an expert panel of 5 oncology nurses of varying backgrounds. Eligibility for the study include; diagnosis and treatment with chemotherapy before the age of 50, being at least 18 yrs of age and able to give informed consent and having completed chemotherapy in the last 1-5 yrs. A pilot study is currently being conducted with a sample of 8 breast cancer survivors to determine reliability and validity of the questionnaire. The questionnaire will then be mailed to 175 members of the local Young Breast Cancer Survivors, members of the Wellness Community Breast Cancer Support Group and individuals identified by oncologist and oncology nurses. Anticipating return of 40-50 questionnaires. Data Analysis: Subjects will be group based on whether or not they felt they had received adequate information regarding the possible sexual side effects of chemotherapy. The groups will be compared using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Findings and Implications: Findings from my study will benefit the young survivors of breast cancer. The limited research done thus far supports client's claims that they are not receiving this vital information from their healthcare providers. I am looking forward to submitting my study results to Oncology Nursing Forum and other professional journals for possible publication.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePremenopausal Breast Cancer Patients Perception of the Quality of Information They Received Concerning the Sexual Side Effects of Chemotherapyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGalante, E.en_US
dc.author.detailsE. Galante, Regional Oncology Hematology Associated of Delaware, Wilmington, Delaware, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164649-
dc.description.abstractThe premenopausal breast cancer survivor's perception of the quality and quantity of education they received form their healthcare provider concerning the possible sexual side effects of chemotherapy. The oncology nurse is a unique position to affect a client's adaptation to the sexual side effects they may experience due to chemotherapy. Purpose: Sexuality and Sexual expression are an important aspect of a person's mental and physical well-being. Standard of care for many premenopausal breast cancer patients includes the administration of adjuvant chemotherapy. Many of these women will experience either temporary or permanent ovarian failure due to that chemotherapy. Sexual side effects and its impact on the quality of life for the breast cancer survivor have been well studied and reported in the literature. The client's perception of the availability of healthcare providers in discussing sexual issues has been less studied. The purpose of this study is to answer two research questions: 1) Do patients feel they received adequate information concerning the possible sexual side effects of chemotherapy from healthcare providers? 2) From whom and at what point in the cancer care continuum this information was obtained? Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The Roy Adaptation Model was used as the study's conceptual framework. A diagnosis of cancer often brings with it a period of constant adaptation for the patient and family. The Roy Model has been shown to be effective in many areas of oncology nursing. A basic premise of the framework is that the individual is a biophychosocial being in constant interaction with a changing environment. At issue are the individual's adaptation to both internal and external stimuli and the nurse's role in helping the patient and family attain a level of adaptation that is satisfactory to them. Methods: This study is a retrospective, quantitative study. A 25 item, five point Likert scale questionnaire was developed. The questionnaire was then reviewed for readability, ease of administration and sensitivity with an expert panel of 5 oncology nurses of varying backgrounds. Eligibility for the study include; diagnosis and treatment with chemotherapy before the age of 50, being at least 18 yrs of age and able to give informed consent and having completed chemotherapy in the last 1-5 yrs. A pilot study is currently being conducted with a sample of 8 breast cancer survivors to determine reliability and validity of the questionnaire. The questionnaire will then be mailed to 175 members of the local Young Breast Cancer Survivors, members of the Wellness Community Breast Cancer Support Group and individuals identified by oncologist and oncology nurses. Anticipating return of 40-50 questionnaires. Data Analysis: Subjects will be group based on whether or not they felt they had received adequate information regarding the possible sexual side effects of chemotherapy. The groups will be compared using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Findings and Implications: Findings from my study will benefit the young survivors of breast cancer. The limited research done thus far supports client's claims that they are not receiving this vital information from their healthcare providers. I am looking forward to submitting my study results to Oncology Nursing Forum and other professional journals for possible publication.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:31Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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