Nurses' Perceived Barriers to the Provision of Spiritual Care and Their Coping Mechanism

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164650
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Perceived Barriers to the Provision of Spiritual Care and Their Coping Mechanism
Author(s):
Hoon, T.; Ping, L.; Ang, E.
Author Details:
T. Hoon, The Cancer Institute, National University Hospital, Singapore; L. Ping; E. Ang
Abstract:
Studies have shown that more than one third (40%) of nurses had expressed providing spiritual needs to the patients and their family being the least effective in the hematology-oncology wards (Lee, 2003). It was suggested the provision of such care was hindered by wide and different definition of spirituality, lack of staff, time, and resources. In achieving holistic nursing care, nurses need to overcome all the possible obstacles and have excellent knowledge and skills to provide not only physical, mental, and social care but also spiritual care as well in order to improve patient’s quality of life. Purpose: The purpose of this study were to identify nurses’ perceived barriers in the provision of spiritual care and explore their coping mechanism. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: N/A Methods: This qualitative, phenomenology study sample consisted of 11 registered nurses who had been working in hematology-oncology setting from 1 month to 10 years. Written questionnaires were used to assess nurses’ perceived barriers in the provision of spiritual care and their coping mechanism when they faced difficulties of providing spiritual care. Verbal consent was obtained from the nurse’s prior the study and confidentiality and anonymity was assured Data Analysis: The data were transcribed and subjected to content analysis and categories were developed and described. The final themes that emerge from the study were subjected to peer reviews to ensure reliability and validity of findings. Findings and Implications: The results suggested majority of the nurses listed lack of rapport with patients and not knowing how to approach patients as the most difficult reason they faced in recognizing and meeting patients’ spiritual needs followed by differences in religious and cultural background. In coping with the difficulties experienced, majority of the nurses coped by finding time to interact with patients in the midst of heavy workload to established rapport, seeking help from fellow colleagues and other resources. The study concluded that there is a great need to empower nurses with adequate knowledge and skills in meeting patients’ spiritual needs despite religious and cultural differences. This will then release the nurses from the fear of offending patients as they provide spiritual care to patients in the pursuit of holistic nursing.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Perceived Barriers to the Provision of Spiritual Care and Their Coping Mechanismen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoon, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPing, L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAng, E.en_US
dc.author.detailsT. Hoon, The Cancer Institute, National University Hospital, Singapore; L. Ping; E. Angen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164650-
dc.description.abstractStudies have shown that more than one third (40%) of nurses had expressed providing spiritual needs to the patients and their family being the least effective in the hematology-oncology wards (Lee, 2003). It was suggested the provision of such care was hindered by wide and different definition of spirituality, lack of staff, time, and resources. In achieving holistic nursing care, nurses need to overcome all the possible obstacles and have excellent knowledge and skills to provide not only physical, mental, and social care but also spiritual care as well in order to improve patient’s quality of life. Purpose: The purpose of this study were to identify nurses’ perceived barriers in the provision of spiritual care and explore their coping mechanism. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: N/A Methods: This qualitative, phenomenology study sample consisted of 11 registered nurses who had been working in hematology-oncology setting from 1 month to 10 years. Written questionnaires were used to assess nurses’ perceived barriers in the provision of spiritual care and their coping mechanism when they faced difficulties of providing spiritual care. Verbal consent was obtained from the nurse’s prior the study and confidentiality and anonymity was assured Data Analysis: The data were transcribed and subjected to content analysis and categories were developed and described. The final themes that emerge from the study were subjected to peer reviews to ensure reliability and validity of findings. Findings and Implications: The results suggested majority of the nurses listed lack of rapport with patients and not knowing how to approach patients as the most difficult reason they faced in recognizing and meeting patients’ spiritual needs followed by differences in religious and cultural background. In coping with the difficulties experienced, majority of the nurses coped by finding time to interact with patients in the midst of heavy workload to established rapport, seeking help from fellow colleagues and other resources. The study concluded that there is a great need to empower nurses with adequate knowledge and skills in meeting patients’ spiritual needs despite religious and cultural differences. This will then release the nurses from the fear of offending patients as they provide spiritual care to patients in the pursuit of holistic nursing.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:32Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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