2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164654
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping Strategies and Perceived Stressors in Chinese Americans With Cancer
Author(s):
Sun, V.; Knobf, M.
Author Details:
V. Sun, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA; M. Knobf
Abstract:
Culture, Stress, Coping Purpose: The burden of cancer on minority populations has led to continued health disparities in the United States. A complex relationship exists between race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status in relation to the cancer experience. The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify coping strategies and perceived stressors in Chinese Americans with cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The theoretical framework used is Lazarus and Folkman’s theory of stress and coping. Coping is used as a primary mechanism to adapt to a stressful situation such as illness. Lazarus proposed two types of coping mechanisms: problem-focused coping and emotion-focused coping. Methods: This descriptive study recruited a sample size of twelve Chinese Americans with cancer residing in the Greater San Francisco Bay Area. Data was collected from June to August 2001 using the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale and face-to-face interviews. The Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale was designed to measure coping behaviors. Cronbach’s alpha reliability was .86. Qualitative data was collected using open-ended questions that elicited participants’ perceived stressors since diagnoses. The data collection procedure began with the completion of the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale followed by interview using open-ended questions. Data Analysis: Data were entered and analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) program. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze for all coping behaviors in the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale to determine frequency and effectiveness of each item. Qualitative data was analyzed using content analysis techniques, and themes from the data were identified. Findings and Implications: Participants were primarily female (58.3%) with breast cancer (33.3%) and were college educated (75%). Age ranged from 44 to 82, with a mean of 61. Styles of coping most frequently used by participants were the confrontive and self-reliant styles. Perceived stressors included fear of recurrence, uncertainty, loss of control, treatment disabilities, financial burdens, language barriers, and fear of abandonment. Findings indicate that Chinese Americans with cancer used self-reliance as a coping strategy and found issues such as language barriers stressful. Further research is warranted to advance knowledge of the specific coping strategies utilized among culturally diverse populations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Anaheim, California, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping Strategies and Perceived Stressors in Chinese Americans With Canceren_GB
dc.contributor.authorSun, V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKnobf, M.en_US
dc.author.detailsV. Sun, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California, USA; M. Knobfen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164654-
dc.description.abstractCulture, Stress, Coping Purpose: The burden of cancer on minority populations has led to continued health disparities in the United States. A complex relationship exists between race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status in relation to the cancer experience. The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify coping strategies and perceived stressors in Chinese Americans with cancer. Theoretical/Scientific Framework: The theoretical framework used is Lazarus and Folkman’s theory of stress and coping. Coping is used as a primary mechanism to adapt to a stressful situation such as illness. Lazarus proposed two types of coping mechanisms: problem-focused coping and emotion-focused coping. Methods: This descriptive study recruited a sample size of twelve Chinese Americans with cancer residing in the Greater San Francisco Bay Area. Data was collected from June to August 2001 using the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale and face-to-face interviews. The Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale was designed to measure coping behaviors. Cronbach’s alpha reliability was .86. Qualitative data was collected using open-ended questions that elicited participants’ perceived stressors since diagnoses. The data collection procedure began with the completion of the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale followed by interview using open-ended questions. Data Analysis: Data were entered and analyzed using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) program. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze for all coping behaviors in the Revised Jalowiec Coping Scale to determine frequency and effectiveness of each item. Qualitative data was analyzed using content analysis techniques, and themes from the data were identified. Findings and Implications: Participants were primarily female (58.3%) with breast cancer (33.3%) and were college educated (75%). Age ranged from 44 to 82, with a mean of 61. Styles of coping most frequently used by participants were the confrontive and self-reliant styles. Perceived stressors included fear of recurrence, uncertainty, loss of control, treatment disabilities, financial burdens, language barriers, and fear of abandonment. Findings indicate that Chinese Americans with cancer used self-reliance as a coping strategy and found issues such as language barriers stressful. Further research is warranted to advance knowledge of the specific coping strategies utilized among culturally diverse populations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:36Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name29th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationAnaheim, California, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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