CANCER SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT RESEARCH IN DISADVANTAGED MINORITY PATIENTS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164655
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CANCER SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT RESEARCH IN DISADVANTAGED MINORITY PATIENTS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Author(s):
Chou, Fang-Yu
Author Details:
Fang-Yu Chou, RN, PhD, UCSF, San Francisco, California, USA
Abstract:
This paper addresses the challenges and opportunities in the cancer-related symptom management nursing research among disadvantaged minority oncology patients. An on-going study in cancer symptom management of Chinese immigrants is used to guide the discussion of recruitment issues in disadvantaged bilingual cancer patients. Patients with low English proficiency are not recruited in most health care research due to language difficulties and socio-cultural barriers. As for Chinese Americans and recent immigrants, the majority of them who are not yet proficient in English often do not participate in research and surveys (Ren & Chang, 1998). Up to date, very few studies have investigated the cancer-related symptom experience and self-care among Chinese Americans and immigrants. An on-going pilot study is conducted at a county medical center in San Francisco Bay Area to recruit Chinese-speaking immigrant cancer patients receiving Chemotherapy for exploring their symptom prevalence, self-care strategies, and quality of life. Most of the participants were not fluent in English and with low-income status. Translated standardized questionnaires and bilingual recruiters were used. There are about 30% refusal rate to participate in the study among eligible Chinese patients. Reasons patients refused to participate included such as “do not want to be bothered and/or talk about cancer”; “too busy”;” family rejection”; “concern of privacy issue”. Reasons patients refused to participate in research studies were reported similarly in a study of Chinese family caregiver of dementia (Hinton, et al., 2000). Cancer can carries a social stigma among Chinese and research participation can be viewed as an intrusive event to reexperience distress related to cancer diagnosis. Strategies such as providing clear communication on the purpose of the research in participants’ preferred language, emphasizing on the importance and benefit of the study to the society and themselves, and ensuring their privacy during the study could be helpful to recruit disadvantaged Chinese patients with active cancer treatments. Well-trained bilingual recruiters and data collectors are necessary. As the cancer populations become more diverse in ethnic and socioeconomic status (Aziz & Rowland, 2002), especially at most urban areas, research studies within and across cultural subgroups are important to expand our knowledge of effective recruitment and retention in research studies, culturally-sensitive cancer care, and issues of potential health disparities.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Ortho Biotech Products, L.P.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCANCER SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT RESEARCH IN DISADVANTAGED MINORITY PATIENTS: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIESen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChou, Fang-Yuen_US
dc.author.detailsFang-Yu Chou, RN, PhD, UCSF, San Francisco, California, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164655-
dc.description.abstractThis paper addresses the challenges and opportunities in the cancer-related symptom management nursing research among disadvantaged minority oncology patients. An on-going study in cancer symptom management of Chinese immigrants is used to guide the discussion of recruitment issues in disadvantaged bilingual cancer patients. Patients with low English proficiency are not recruited in most health care research due to language difficulties and socio-cultural barriers. As for Chinese Americans and recent immigrants, the majority of them who are not yet proficient in English often do not participate in research and surveys (Ren & Chang, 1998). Up to date, very few studies have investigated the cancer-related symptom experience and self-care among Chinese Americans and immigrants. An on-going pilot study is conducted at a county medical center in San Francisco Bay Area to recruit Chinese-speaking immigrant cancer patients receiving Chemotherapy for exploring their symptom prevalence, self-care strategies, and quality of life. Most of the participants were not fluent in English and with low-income status. Translated standardized questionnaires and bilingual recruiters were used. There are about 30% refusal rate to participate in the study among eligible Chinese patients. Reasons patients refused to participate included such as “do not want to be bothered and/or talk about cancer”; “too busy”;” family rejection”; “concern of privacy issue”. Reasons patients refused to participate in research studies were reported similarly in a study of Chinese family caregiver of dementia (Hinton, et al., 2000). Cancer can carries a social stigma among Chinese and research participation can be viewed as an intrusive event to reexperience distress related to cancer diagnosis. Strategies such as providing clear communication on the purpose of the research in participants’ preferred language, emphasizing on the importance and benefit of the study to the society and themselves, and ensuring their privacy during the study could be helpful to recruit disadvantaged Chinese patients with active cancer treatments. Well-trained bilingual recruiters and data collectors are necessary. As the cancer populations become more diverse in ethnic and socioeconomic status (Aziz & Rowland, 2002), especially at most urban areas, research studies within and across cultural subgroups are important to expand our knowledge of effective recruitment and retention in research studies, culturally-sensitive cancer care, and issues of potential health disparities.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:38Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Ortho Biotech Products, L.P.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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