2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164656
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
PATTERNS OF SMOKING IN WOMEN WITH LUNG CANCER
Author(s):
Cooley, Mary; Sarna, Linda; Danao, Leda; Brown, Jean; Chernecky, Cynthia; Padilla, Geraldine
Author Details:
Mary Cooley, PhD, RN, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Linda Sarna, DNSc, RN, FAAN; Leda Danao, PhD, BSN; Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN; Cynthia Chernecky, PhD, RN; Geraldine Padilla, PhD
Abstract:
Smoking cessation after a cancer diagnosis is associated with decreased secondary malignancies, decreased treatment complications, and increased survival. Few studies describe tobacco use, readiness to quit, and cessation strategies in women after a diagnosis of lung cancer. The purposes of this longitudinal study were to determine patterns of smoking at entry to the study, 3 and 6 months later, identify readiness to quit and cessation strategies at entry to the study, and examine factors associated with continued smoking over time. The Transtheoretical Model was used to guide this study Data were collected from 230 women with non-small cell lung cancer at entry to the study, 3 and 6 months later. Complete data was available for 161 women. The mean age of the sample was 65 years, 84% were Caucasian, 11% were African American, and 81% had early stage disease. The mean time since diagnosis was 2 years. Data were collected through reliable and valid standardized questionnaires and interviews, medical record review, and anthropometrics. Current smoking was determined through self-report and biochemical verification with urinary cotinine Descriptive statistics, chi-square and t-tests were used for analyses. Eighty-seven percent of women reported ever smoking, 37% reported smoking at the time of diagnosis, and 14% continued smoking at entry to the study, 13% at 3 months, and 11% at 6 months. Most smokers (60%) planned a quit attempt within the next month. Approximately one-third of smokers received assistance with cessation after their diagnosis. Nicotine replacement or buproprion was identified as the most common cessation strategies. Significant factors associated with continued smoking at all three data points included being unmarried, younger, and exposed to secondhand smoke. These findings suggest that the diagnosis of cancer is a strong motivator for behavioral change and that some patients need additional support in order to quit smoking.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Bristol Meyers Squibb Foundation; and National Cancer Institute.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePATTERNS OF SMOKING IN WOMEN WITH LUNG CANCERen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooley, Maryen_US
dc.contributor.authorSarna, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDanao, Ledaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorChernecky, Cynthiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorPadilla, Geraldineen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Cooley, PhD, RN, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Linda Sarna, DNSc, RN, FAAN; Leda Danao, PhD, BSN; Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN; Cynthia Chernecky, PhD, RN; Geraldine Padilla, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164656-
dc.description.abstractSmoking cessation after a cancer diagnosis is associated with decreased secondary malignancies, decreased treatment complications, and increased survival. Few studies describe tobacco use, readiness to quit, and cessation strategies in women after a diagnosis of lung cancer. The purposes of this longitudinal study were to determine patterns of smoking at entry to the study, 3 and 6 months later, identify readiness to quit and cessation strategies at entry to the study, and examine factors associated with continued smoking over time. The Transtheoretical Model was used to guide this study Data were collected from 230 women with non-small cell lung cancer at entry to the study, 3 and 6 months later. Complete data was available for 161 women. The mean age of the sample was 65 years, 84% were Caucasian, 11% were African American, and 81% had early stage disease. The mean time since diagnosis was 2 years. Data were collected through reliable and valid standardized questionnaires and interviews, medical record review, and anthropometrics. Current smoking was determined through self-report and biochemical verification with urinary cotinine Descriptive statistics, chi-square and t-tests were used for analyses. Eighty-seven percent of women reported ever smoking, 37% reported smoking at the time of diagnosis, and 14% continued smoking at entry to the study, 13% at 3 months, and 11% at 6 months. Most smokers (60%) planned a quit attempt within the next month. Approximately one-third of smokers received assistance with cessation after their diagnosis. Nicotine replacement or buproprion was identified as the most common cessation strategies. Significant factors associated with continued smoking at all three data points included being unmarried, younger, and exposed to secondhand smoke. These findings suggest that the diagnosis of cancer is a strong motivator for behavioral change and that some patients need additional support in order to quit smoking.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:39Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Funded by the ONS Foundation through an unrestricted grant from Bristol Meyers Squibb Foundation; and National Cancer Institute.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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