CHANGES IN THE SEVERITY OF FATIGUE AND THE USE OF SELF CARE BEHAVIORS (SCBS) IN MEN WITH PROSTATE CANCER UNDERGOING RADIATION THERAPY (RT)

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164657
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CHANGES IN THE SEVERITY OF FATIGUE AND THE USE OF SELF CARE BEHAVIORS (SCBS) IN MEN WITH PROSTATE CANCER UNDERGOING RADIATION THERAPY (RT)
Author(s):
Fletcher, Barbara; Gabriel, Michelle; Miaskowski, Christine; West, Claudia; Dodd, Marylin; Lee, Kathryn; Paul, Steven
Author Details:
Barbara Fletcher, RN, BS, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA; Michelle Gabriel, RN; Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhD, FAAN; Claudia West, RN, MS; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN; Kathryn Lee, RN, PhD, FAAN; Steven Paul, PhD
Abstract:
While fatigue is known to occur during RT, studies with specific populations are extremely limited. In addition, no studies have evaluated the use of SCBs by patients during RT. The purposes of this longitudinal study were to evaluate for changes in fatigue severity in men who did and did not report the use of SCBs and to evaluate for changes over time in the frequency and effectiveness of the SCBs used by these men. The UCSF Symptom Management Model served as the theoretical framework for this study. Men with prostate cancer were recruited from two RT departments and assessments were done prior to the initiation of RT, as well as at the middle and end of RT. At each assessment, patients completed the Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS) in the mornings and in the evening. Following completion of the LFS, the men were asked to indicate if they felt fatigued in the last week and if so to indicate which SCBs from a list of 27 they had used for fatigue and its effectiveness using a 0 to 10 scale. Eighty-two men with a mean age of 67.1 years and a Stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer were recruited for this study. A repeated measures ANOVA determined that men who reported using SCBs had significantly higher levels of both morning and evening fatigue than men who did not report the use of SCBs. In fact, the men who reported the use of SCBs for fatigue had twice as much fatigue at all three time points. The majority of the patients used more then one SCB at any given time. The most commonly used SCBs were: read a book, drank caffeinated liquids, took a nap, and went for a walk. Effectiveness ratings for the SCBs ranged from 3.8 to 6.2. This study is the first to document the use of SCBs for fatigue by men undergoing RT. The patients who initiated SCBs were a distinct group who reported significantly higher levels of fatigue throughout the course of RT and may represent a high risk group that warrants additional investigation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: National Institute of Nursing Research and National Cancer Institute.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCHANGES IN THE SEVERITY OF FATIGUE AND THE USE OF SELF CARE BEHAVIORS (SCBS) IN MEN WITH PROSTATE CANCER UNDERGOING RADIATION THERAPY (RT)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorGabriel, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorMiaskowski, Christineen_US
dc.contributor.authorWest, Claudiaen_US
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Marylinen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Kathrynen_US
dc.contributor.authorPaul, Stevenen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Fletcher, RN, BS, School of Nursing, San Francisco, California, USA; Michelle Gabriel, RN; Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhD, FAAN; Claudia West, RN, MS; Marylin Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN; Kathryn Lee, RN, PhD, FAAN; Steven Paul, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164657-
dc.description.abstractWhile fatigue is known to occur during RT, studies with specific populations are extremely limited. In addition, no studies have evaluated the use of SCBs by patients during RT. The purposes of this longitudinal study were to evaluate for changes in fatigue severity in men who did and did not report the use of SCBs and to evaluate for changes over time in the frequency and effectiveness of the SCBs used by these men. The UCSF Symptom Management Model served as the theoretical framework for this study. Men with prostate cancer were recruited from two RT departments and assessments were done prior to the initiation of RT, as well as at the middle and end of RT. At each assessment, patients completed the Lee Fatigue Scale (LFS) in the mornings and in the evening. Following completion of the LFS, the men were asked to indicate if they felt fatigued in the last week and if so to indicate which SCBs from a list of 27 they had used for fatigue and its effectiveness using a 0 to 10 scale. Eighty-two men with a mean age of 67.1 years and a Stage T1 or T2 prostate cancer were recruited for this study. A repeated measures ANOVA determined that men who reported using SCBs had significantly higher levels of both morning and evening fatigue than men who did not report the use of SCBs. In fact, the men who reported the use of SCBs for fatigue had twice as much fatigue at all three time points. The majority of the patients used more then one SCB at any given time. The most commonly used SCBs were: read a book, drank caffeinated liquids, took a nap, and went for a walk. Effectiveness ratings for the SCBs ranged from 3.8 to 6.2. This study is the first to document the use of SCBs for fatigue by men undergoing RT. The patients who initiated SCBs were a distinct group who reported significantly higher levels of fatigue throughout the course of RT and may represent a high risk group that warrants additional investigation.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:40Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: National Institute of Nursing Research and National Cancer Institute.-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.