2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164660
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CONCERNS OF YOUNG WOMEN WHO ARE POSITIVE FOR BRCA1 AND/OR BRCA2
Author(s):
Hamilton, Rebekah
Author Details:
Rebekah Hamilton, PhD, RN, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
Abstract:
Young women are offered BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing in both primary care and specialty care settings. Few studies have specifically focused on the experience of predictive genetic testing with this age group. Developmental theories lend credence to the suggestion that concerns will be different for this population than for older women in a similar situation. The purpose of the study was to examine the experience of predictive genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and to compare experiences of younger women (35 years old) to the older study cohort (36-60 years old). Grounded theory is an exploratory, theory generating method, used in areas in which little is known. Grounded theory is rooted in the philosophy of symbolic interactionism. The qualitative method of grounded theory was used to examine the phenomenon of adults choosing to have predictive genetic testing for HBOC. A sample of 17 women, seven 35 years olds were recruited through community and internet support group announcements. Semistructured interviews were conducted in-person, by telephone or email according to participant preference. Analysis consisted of line-by-line coding resulting in the development of concepts, categories and relationships which accounted for a pattern of behavior relevant to the experience of predictive genetic testing. Validation was achieved by member checks (3 participants) and feedback from a research group composed of experienced grounded theorists. Please see above, the theoretical framework and methods are combined in a grounded theory study The core category developed was being changed by predictive genetic testing. Young women's experiences were different particularly around concerns about: 1) career plans, 2) reproduction, and 3) intimate relationships. Other concerns not specific to young women but also described included: 1) family relationships, 2) fears of personal mortality, 3) life and health insurance and 4) health information needs. A commonly voiced experience specific to the young adult age group was feeling out-of-place in the oncology clinics and support groups which participants perceived as being focused on concerns of older women. Further study may clarify the extent and nature of informational, emotional, social and decision support needs that are unique to this young adult population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congress
Conference Host:
Oncology Nursing Society
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Sponsors:
Funding Sources: Pre-doctoral T32 fellowship (5T32 NR07102-04).
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCONCERNS OF YOUNG WOMEN WHO ARE POSITIVE FOR BRCA1 AND/OR BRCA2en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Rebekahen_US
dc.author.detailsRebekah Hamilton, PhD, RN, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164660-
dc.description.abstractYoung women are offered BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing in both primary care and specialty care settings. Few studies have specifically focused on the experience of predictive genetic testing with this age group. Developmental theories lend credence to the suggestion that concerns will be different for this population than for older women in a similar situation. The purpose of the study was to examine the experience of predictive genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) and to compare experiences of younger women (35 years old) to the older study cohort (36-60 years old). Grounded theory is an exploratory, theory generating method, used in areas in which little is known. Grounded theory is rooted in the philosophy of symbolic interactionism. The qualitative method of grounded theory was used to examine the phenomenon of adults choosing to have predictive genetic testing for HBOC. A sample of 17 women, seven 35 years olds were recruited through community and internet support group announcements. Semistructured interviews were conducted in-person, by telephone or email according to participant preference. Analysis consisted of line-by-line coding resulting in the development of concepts, categories and relationships which accounted for a pattern of behavior relevant to the experience of predictive genetic testing. Validation was achieved by member checks (3 participants) and feedback from a research group composed of experienced grounded theorists. Please see above, the theoretical framework and methods are combined in a grounded theory study The core category developed was being changed by predictive genetic testing. Young women's experiences were different particularly around concerns about: 1) career plans, 2) reproduction, and 3) intimate relationships. Other concerns not specific to young women but also described included: 1) family relationships, 2) fears of personal mortality, 3) life and health insurance and 4) health information needs. A commonly voiced experience specific to the young adult age group was feeling out-of-place in the oncology clinics and support groups which participants perceived as being focused on concerns of older women. Further study may clarify the extent and nature of informational, emotional, social and decision support needs that are unique to this young adult population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T12:04:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T12:04:43Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.name30th Annual Oncology Nursing Society Congressen_US
dc.conference.hostOncology Nursing Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding Sources: Pre-doctoral T32 fellowship (5T32 NR07102-04).-
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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